Caitlyn Jenner defends voting for Trump

And so Republicans have done a better job in that direction.”
After telling Sawyer she’s “coming after” Trump and the Republican party if they strip rights away from LGBTQ Americans, Jenner criticized   the president for reneging on his campaign promises. All of sudden he gets into office and one of the first things he does, which he never should have done, is repeal the Title IX for equality for trans people in school. “But for me, I’ve been around a long time, I’m probably more conservative. So I did a blog on it, I did a video on it, and at some point I may talk to [Trump]   about it.”
RELATED: Darth Vader, Voldemort, and 7 Other Pop Culture Comparisons to Donald Trump
Jenner, who   revealed her struggles and emotional journey   in the memoir The Secrets of My Life,   added:   “I gotta keep an eye on these people. And I had talked to him about my feelings on that. “Just know that if you talk to him in private, we all seem to find out like   about a day later,” Meyers said,   admitting he’d start cracking jokes about Jenner if she met with Trump. “I was asked a question the other day, ‘Would you vote for him again?’ I said, ‘Wait a second, it’s three and a half years away. Trump, who I talked to before [at] the Inauguration, about a lot of LGBT issues when the whole North Carolina bathroom bill, all that mess. “I’m not a one-issue voter and obviously — I know, I’m not stupid — the Republican party does not do a good job when it comes to equality and the entire LGBT community. My loyalty is with my community, and I will fight for this community. There’s a lot that’s going to happen in that three and a half years and I’ll make that decision at that point,’” she noted. I believe in little things like the Constitution and freedom. Show Full Article Jenner may never end up being one of Trump’s golf buddies —   “I don’t think he wants to get beat by a 67-year-old trans woman” —   but she said she’d speak to him about the issues “in private” where “nobody knows I’m talking to him” in order to bypass the probable backlash from the LGBTQ community. “My loyalty is not with the Republican party. I believe in minimal government…. That was good federal guidelines for states to be able to follow, and I blasted him.”
In other areas, Jenner says, “yes,” Trump has been successful. Caitlyn Jenner opened up about voting for Donald Trump in a   20/20 interview with Diane Sawyer, and the Olympian continued   to defend that vote on Late Night with Seth Meyers. “My loyalty is not with Donald Trump,” she told Meyers. The Democrats are better there,” she said Tuesday night.

Caitlyn Jenner defends voting for Trump

My loyalty is with my community, and I will fight for this community. And I had talked to him about my feelings on that. Trump, who I talked to before [at] the Inauguration, about a lot of LGBT issues when the whole North Carolina bathroom bill, all that mess. So I did a blog on it, I did a video on it, and at some point I may talk to [Trump]   about it.”
RELATED: Darth Vader, Voldemort, and 7 Other Pop Culture Comparisons to Donald Trump
Jenner, who   revealed her struggles and emotional journey   in the memoir The Secrets of My Life,   added:   “I gotta keep an eye on these people. “But for me, I’ve been around a long time, I’m probably more conservative. Show Full Article Caitlyn Jenner opened up about voting for Donald Trump in a   20/20 interview with Diane Sawyer, and the Olympian continued   to defend that vote on Late Night with Seth Meyers. I believe in little things like the Constitution and freedom. “I was asked a question the other day, ‘Would you vote for him again?’ I said, ‘Wait a second, it’s three and a half years away. That was good federal guidelines for states to be able to follow, and I blasted him.”
In other areas, Jenner says, “yes,” Trump has been successful. The Democrats are better there,” she said Tuesday night. There’s a lot that’s going to happen in that three and a half years and I’ll make that decision at that point,’” she noted. And so Republicans have done a better job in that direction.”
After telling Sawyer she’s “coming after” Trump and the Republican party if they strip rights away from LGBTQ Americans, Jenner criticized   the president for reneging on his campaign promises. “Just know that if you talk to him in private, we all seem to find out like   about a day later,” Meyers said,   admitting he’d start cracking jokes about Jenner if she met with Trump. All of sudden he gets into office and one of the first things he does, which he never should have done, is repeal the Title IX for equality for trans people in school. “I’m not a one-issue voter and obviously — I know, I’m not stupid — the Republican party does not do a good job when it comes to equality and the entire LGBT community. I believe in minimal government…. “My loyalty is not with Donald Trump,” she told Meyers. “My loyalty is not with the Republican party. Jenner may never end up being one of Trump’s golf buddies —   “I don’t think he wants to get beat by a 67-year-old trans woman” —   but she said she’d speak to him about the issues “in private” where “nobody knows I’m talking to him” in order to bypass the probable backlash from the LGBTQ community.

‘Pirates of the Caribbean 5’ revisits its dual Disney legacies

Arriving onto   this set, coming out of my trailer in the morning and walking 10 minutes to the set, you see a thousand people all working there. The popular albeit unassuming theme park attraction (the final ride to bear Walt Disney’s personal touch before his death) was transformed into a film in 2003—Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Peal—and suddenly a blockbuster movie franchise was born, certainly not the least of which was because of   an instantly iconic performance by Johnny Depp. “It’s basically a love story. Comedy was very important for Johnny, and we worked really hard to squeeze every drop out of every scene that has humor in it.”
The result, as you’ll perhaps witness on May 26, is a film that brings   Pirates back to its structural roots—both   the animatronic maritime fantasy that   Walt Disney first attempted back when Pirates was but a theme park tryst, and the lightning in a bottle formula that sparked a phenomenon   after the world met Jack Sparrow. Four movies, $1.3 billion dollars, the catapulting of stars like Keira Knightley and Orlando Bloom, and 14 years worth of bad Jack Sparrow impressions later, it’s time to add another Pirates   movie to the mix—and see what it might do to honor   its landlubber   legacy. “On a daily basis, it was a big circus.   “It’s scary, it’s funny, and most of all it’s a comedy, but with great heart, and that structure and the dynamics between the characters was something I really wanted to try and reinvent,” he says. “Henry and Carina are on a similar quest and find common ground in looking for who they are, which I think is a huge part of what I tried to put into the story.” Like   Orlando Bloom’s once-curious Will Turner, the search for   identity   is a major theme, says   the director, teasing: “A treasure is not always a casket full of gold.”
So, there’s the heart (and trust   that fans of Will and Elizabeth won’t be disappointed in their emotional offerings, either). As for ensuring that Dead Men maintains the first film’s comic legacy, the task again rests   on the shoulders of Depp. To read more from EW’s Summer Movie Preview, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands now, or buy it here. In the fifth film, Henry sparks on his journey with aspiring astronomer and ever-fleeing rogue   Carina (Kaya Scodelario); in their pairing, the filmmakers found a new connection on which they could anchor a new story and a heartstring or two. He knows this character inside and out, and that’s such a luxury, as a director, to work with someone like that. It’s easy to forget that Pirates of the Caribbean began its life over half a century ago, in 1957, when Disneyland introduced a dark water ride set in the bawdy, dangerous world of buccaneers evidently somewhere between the bayou and the Bahamas. Don’t forget to   subscribe   for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. He loved our meetings in his trailer, making the best out of every scene. He comes on set, it’s one or two takes, and I can move on. But at the same time, it was very much a collaboration. Dead Men Tell No Tales, the fifth in the swashbuckling series, promises to do a few things in its May 26 release: Give Jack Sparrow another fabled treasure to pursue (the trident of Poseidon) and villain to vanquish (Javier Bardem’s Captain Salazar, a vengeful Spanish admiral whom a young Jack turned into a   waterlogged   zombie); expand   the story of the Turner family by introducing Will and Elizabeth’s headstrong son, Henry (Brenton Thwaites); and brush off some of the tonal touchstones from the first Pirates film that may have   eroded after a decade and a half of seawater. Though the actor is aided by other legacy ingredients—outrageous Caribbean chases, inept British officers, and even the return of a bumbling pair of   fan-favorite characters—it’s Depp whom Rønning calls a “comedic genius” for his effortless mania, especially during Jack’s bountiful action sequences: “He has a comedic timing that I’ve never seen in anyone. But it’s important that, since Jack doesn’t really have a character arc, you as an audience have to really   invest in the other characters.”
What Rønning, Sandberg, and screenwriter Jeff Nathanson were keen to craft was a new protagonist relationship   of decidedly different ilk than, say, the two relationships explored in On Stranger Tides (between Jack and his former paramour Angelica, and between a missionary and a mermaid). Show Full Article “The first Pirates of the Caribbean reminded me of the movies that I grew up with, the Zemeckis and Spielberg and Lucas adventures that inspired me to become a filmmaker, so coming back to that was a dream come true for me,” says Joachim Rønning, who, with co-director Espen Sandberg, was entrusted with the franchise’s steering wheel (or whatever the nautical folk call it) after their 2012 expedition drama, Kon-Tiki. “It was all there in this   script already, and for me, it was just a matter of adding scenes that carry on the tradition of Gore Verbinski, bring the emotional core and big action pieces, and [take inspiration from] the physical humor of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton,” Rønning gushes. It’s a period piece, yes, but about real people falling in love, with Jack Sparrow coming in every now and then crashing the party. Rønning isn’t shy about naming the first film his favorite in the franchise, or calling it his biggest inspiration for Dead Men Tell No Tales, having analyzed the exact ingredients he treasured. And you do… get a little lost… at sea.” Apparently, Dead Men do tell puns. “In the middle of a big action scene, you need to be able to lean on the characters and find the heart of that story and channel the   characters’ vulnerability,” says Rønning.

‘Pirates of the Caribbean 5’ revisits its dual Disney legacies

Four movies, $1.3 billion dollars, the catapulting of stars like Keira Knightley and Orlando Bloom, and 14 years worth of bad Jack Sparrow impressions later, it’s time to add another Pirates   movie to the mix—and see what it might do to honor   its landlubber   legacy. In the fifth film, Henry sparks on his journey with aspiring astronomer and ever-fleeing rogue   Carina (Kaya Scodelario); in their pairing, the filmmakers found a new connection on which they could anchor a new story and a heartstring or two. Rønning isn’t shy about naming the first film his favorite in the franchise, or calling it his biggest inspiration for Dead Men Tell No Tales, having analyzed the exact ingredients he treasured. Show Full Article But it’s important that, since Jack doesn’t really have a character arc, you as an audience have to really   invest in the other characters.”
What Rønning, Sandberg, and screenwriter Jeff Nathanson were keen to craft was a new protagonist relationship   of decidedly different ilk than, say, the two relationships explored in On Stranger Tides (between Jack and his former paramour Angelica, and between a missionary and a mermaid). “Henry and Carina are on a similar quest and find common ground in looking for who they are, which I think is a huge part of what I tried to put into the story.” Like   Orlando Bloom’s once-curious Will Turner, the search for   identity   is a major theme, says   the director, teasing: “A treasure is not always a casket full of gold.”
So, there’s the heart (and trust   that fans of Will and Elizabeth won’t be disappointed in their emotional offerings, either). And you do… get a little lost… at sea.” Apparently, Dead Men do tell puns. Don’t forget to   subscribe   for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. “It’s basically a love story. Dead Men Tell No Tales, the fifth in the swashbuckling series, promises to do a few things in its May 26 release: Give Jack Sparrow another fabled treasure to pursue (the trident of Poseidon) and villain to vanquish (Javier Bardem’s Captain Salazar, a vengeful Spanish admiral whom a young Jack turned into a   waterlogged   zombie); expand   the story of the Turner family by introducing Will and Elizabeth’s headstrong son, Henry (Brenton Thwaites); and brush off some of the tonal touchstones from the first Pirates film that may have   eroded after a decade and a half of seawater. “It was all there in this   script already, and for me, it was just a matter of adding scenes that carry on the tradition of Gore Verbinski, bring the emotional core and big action pieces, and [take inspiration from] the physical humor of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton,” Rønning gushes. It’s easy to forget that Pirates of the Caribbean began its life over half a century ago, in 1957, when Disneyland introduced a dark water ride set in the bawdy, dangerous world of buccaneers evidently somewhere between the bayou and the Bahamas. “The first Pirates of the Caribbean reminded me of the movies that I grew up with, the Zemeckis and Spielberg and Lucas adventures that inspired me to become a filmmaker, so coming back to that was a dream come true for me,” says Joachim Rønning, who, with co-director Espen Sandberg, was entrusted with the franchise’s steering wheel (or whatever the nautical folk call it) after their 2012 expedition drama, Kon-Tiki. He comes on set, it’s one or two takes, and I can move on. Comedy was very important for Johnny, and we worked really hard to squeeze every drop out of every scene that has humor in it.”
The result, as you’ll perhaps witness on May 26, is a film that brings   Pirates back to its structural roots—both   the animatronic maritime fantasy that   Walt Disney first attempted back when Pirates was but a theme park tryst, and the lightning in a bottle formula that sparked a phenomenon   after the world met Jack Sparrow. “In the middle of a big action scene, you need to be able to lean on the characters and find the heart of that story and channel the   characters’ vulnerability,” says Rønning. But at the same time, it was very much a collaboration. As for ensuring that Dead Men maintains the first film’s comic legacy, the task again rests   on the shoulders of Depp. Arriving onto   this set, coming out of my trailer in the morning and walking 10 minutes to the set, you see a thousand people all working there. He loved our meetings in his trailer, making the best out of every scene. “On a daily basis, it was a big circus. Though the actor is aided by other legacy ingredients—outrageous Caribbean chases, inept British officers, and even the return of a bumbling pair of   fan-favorite characters—it’s Depp whom Rønning calls a “comedic genius” for his effortless mania, especially during Jack’s bountiful action sequences: “He has a comedic timing that I’ve never seen in anyone.   “It’s scary, it’s funny, and most of all it’s a comedy, but with great heart, and that structure and the dynamics between the characters was something I really wanted to try and reinvent,” he says. It’s a period piece, yes, but about real people falling in love, with Jack Sparrow coming in every now and then crashing the party. The popular albeit unassuming theme park attraction (the final ride to bear Walt Disney’s personal touch before his death) was transformed into a film in 2003—Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Peal—and suddenly a blockbuster movie franchise was born, certainly not the least of which was because of   an instantly iconic performance by Johnny Depp. To read more from EW’s Summer Movie Preview, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands now, or buy it here. He knows this character inside and out, and that’s such a luxury, as a director, to work with someone like that.

The Wonders reunite to perform ‘That Thing You Do!’ in L.A.

#stevezahn and @tomhanks you were missed! One of the best @thegdcomedyjam we have ever done. It was magical. While they were sans Tom Hanks, who played Mr. thank u @stephenzahn surrogate #thewonders #theoneders #thatthingyoudo @headbitchmusic
A post shared by Ryan Vaughn (@ryandrummerboy) on Apr 25, 2017 at 9:53pm PDT

Scott   teased the concert on Twitter with a link pointing to The Goddamn   Comedy Jam with Bill Burr. Tonight at the Roxy their might be a little surprise for TTYD! Johnathon Schaech,   Ethan Embry, and   Tom Everett Scott rocked the Roxy on Tuesday night. He then appeared in a backstage photo posted to Embry’s account with the message,   “When we reunion, we reunion hard.”

Los Angelenos!! “I remember it reached that point of, like, ‘I can’t play this song one more time.’” Still, Josh Adam Meyers, who facilitated the reunion for   The Goddamn Comedy Jam, noted the performance was “magical” in   a video post on Instagram. Played the hit song from the movie. “I hate that song,” Embry   recalled   to EW of the track for the film’s 20th anniversary. Thank you @thetomeverettscott @johnschaech @ethanembry. gonna leave this right here… #thewonders #theoneders #thatthingyoudo #skitchpatterson #tbplayer #jimmymattingly #reunion @headbitchmusic
A post shared by Ryan Vaughn (@ryandrummerboy) on Apr 25, 2017 at 9:44pm PDT

#thatthingyoudo at the Roxy #shades
A post shared by Johnathon Schaech (@johnschaech) on Apr 25, 2017 at 9:20pm PDT

Show Full Article White, Schaech (Jimmy Mattingly), Embry (the unnamed bass player), and Scott (Shades) rocked out to the titular song. “[Tom Hanks,] you were missed.”

We reunited The Wonders aka The Oneders from the movie That Thing You Do. The trio’s on-stage performance in Los Angeles marked the latest semi-reunion of The Wonders, formerly named The Oneders, from the 1996 movie That Thing You Do! someone wearing a cut-out of Zahn’s face). pic.twitter.com/qv9yM9vCt9
— Ethan Embry (@EmbryEthan) April 26, 2017

See more photos and video from their reunion performance below. fans…😎https://t.co/wb40lcNpvV
— Tom Everett Scott (@TomEScott) April 25, 2017

When we reunion, we reunion hard. “Tonight at the Roxy their might be a little surprise for TTYD,” he wrote. A post shared by Josh Adam Meyers (@joshadammeyers) on Apr 26, 2017 at 12:46am PDT

Steve Zahn (Lenny Haiz) was also missing in action, but the group had a stand-in (i.e.

The Wonders reunite to perform ‘That Thing You Do!’ in L.A.

Thank you @thetomeverettscott @johnschaech @ethanembry. A post shared by Josh Adam Meyers (@joshadammeyers) on Apr 26, 2017 at 12:46am PDT

Steve Zahn (Lenny Haiz) was also missing in action, but the group had a stand-in (i.e. Johnathon Schaech,   Ethan Embry, and   Tom Everett Scott rocked the Roxy on Tuesday night. Played the hit song from the movie. It was magical. thank u @stephenzahn surrogate #thewonders #theoneders #thatthingyoudo @headbitchmusic
A post shared by Ryan Vaughn (@ryandrummerboy) on Apr 25, 2017 at 9:53pm PDT

Scott   teased the concert on Twitter with a link pointing to The Goddamn   Comedy Jam with Bill Burr. “[Tom Hanks,] you were missed.”

We reunited The Wonders aka The Oneders from the movie That Thing You Do. “I remember it reached that point of, like, ‘I can’t play this song one more time.’” Still, Josh Adam Meyers, who facilitated the reunion for   The Goddamn Comedy Jam, noted the performance was “magical” in   a video post on Instagram. One of the best @thegdcomedyjam we have ever done. While they were sans Tom Hanks, who played Mr. “Tonight at the Roxy their might be a little surprise for TTYD,” he wrote. pic.twitter.com/qv9yM9vCt9
— Ethan Embry (@EmbryEthan) April 26, 2017

See more photos and video from their reunion performance below. White, Schaech (Jimmy Mattingly), Embry (the unnamed bass player), and Scott (Shades) rocked out to the titular song. #stevezahn and @tomhanks you were missed! gonna leave this right here… #thewonders #theoneders #thatthingyoudo #skitchpatterson #tbplayer #jimmymattingly #reunion @headbitchmusic
A post shared by Ryan Vaughn (@ryandrummerboy) on Apr 25, 2017 at 9:44pm PDT

#thatthingyoudo at the Roxy #shades
A post shared by Johnathon Schaech (@johnschaech) on Apr 25, 2017 at 9:20pm PDT

Show Full Article Tonight at the Roxy their might be a little surprise for TTYD! fans…😎https://t.co/wb40lcNpvV
— Tom Everett Scott (@TomEScott) April 25, 2017

When we reunion, we reunion hard. “I hate that song,” Embry   recalled   to EW of the track for the film’s 20th anniversary. someone wearing a cut-out of Zahn’s face). He then appeared in a backstage photo posted to Embry’s account with the message,   “When we reunion, we reunion hard.”

Los Angelenos!! The trio’s on-stage performance in Los Angeles marked the latest semi-reunion of The Wonders, formerly named The Oneders, from the 1996 movie That Thing You Do!

Stephen Colbert’s Tuck Buckford skewers Alex Jones’ war on Chobani

That it’s a natural protein-rich gamma ray shield to keep the Clinton Foundation from reading your dreams,” he shouted. Whenever right-leaning InfoWars personality Alex Jones gets heated about something, Tuck Buckford isn’t far behind. “George Soros doesn’t want you to know the real value of yogurt, okay? Colbert’s character promised he won’t   “rollover for big yogurt, the Illumi-Chobani,” but then proceeded to slather the yogurt all over his head. “You can’t get in here, John Podesta,” he said later with a forehead covered in Chobani. My brain is a steel trap. According to The New York Times, the yogurt company is suing the “hernia who wished he was a real boy” (that’s Colbert’s nickname for Jones) for spreading “false” and “defamatory” accusations, like when Jones linked a Chobani factory in Idaho to a child sexual assault and the rise   of   tuberculosis. I don’t even know why I’m doing this because I can’t read my brain right now.”
Watch Colbert’s Buckford in the clip above. Show Full Article Stephen Colbert reprised his volatile conservative character on The Late Show Tuesday night in mocking Jones’ legal woes with Chobani. “You can’t put yogurt on a pizza. I can’t even tell what I’m thinking. Jones, in turn, declared on his program that he’s “not backing down” — and neither is Buckford.

‘Blindspot’ star Michelle Hurd goes BTS Thailand-set action hour

It was like camp for adults. In Bangkok, people were doing their thing, they were doing their days, they were going about their business. There are tons and tons of people and tons and tons of shops, as well as motorcycles, just motorcycles. We wanted to get this other foot pattern running shot, so we went to the old market. This was a little bit the same thing, even though we worked like crazy people from the moment we touched down. Show Full Article I remember at one point where I’m on the street, I’ve just fallen off the truck and we wanted to get this shot where I’m on the concrete on the street and the cops come around me and then I get up. They’re just hard, hard, hard-working. The entire crew was just powdered dry. Here’s what happened in Thailand:
It was pretty awesome. There was this one old market where we had just finished doing the running where I run by tuk-tuks and jump over a car. Go!” I would literally ask Chris, “Who are my stunt people?” “Everybody who is a stunt person who I can touch, raise your hand so I can see you so I don’t knock over anybody else!” They’d literally be randomly spaced out and real people would be in between. I would just take off and try to make eye contact with my stunt people. I kept saying, “What else do we need? I’m like, “What’s going on? Although, I always joke being a native New Yorker that when we shoot in New York, New Yorkers are like, “I don’t care! Is there something wrong here? I just jumped on the ground and I’m lying down and at one point I was like, “Do we have traffic held up in the back there, since I’m lying here in the middle of the street?” They’re like, “Yeah, yeah, no I’m sure we do.” I’m like, “I’m glad that we’re sure we do.” [Laughs] It was kind of crazy. There was this beautiful vista to take in and try to bring to life on camera. ET on NBC. As soon as I stepped out on the set, I would literally just be drenched with sweat because it’s so hot. So our little group flew out from the States and then we had a fabulous group of Thailand locals, who really worked like nobody’s business to get our days in. I kept joking that that show was like camp for adults because we all came from New York or Los Angeles and we’d go down there for five months and it was like playtime. It’s almost like if you were down by Santa Monica and they have the fairs with all the booths and how it gets really crowded, so that kind of crowded, but compressed with space, so not as wide; very truncated and really narrow. I can’t even figure out an equivalent to what this space is like. They’re a really stellar group and so wonderful. I’ll do this! It was a completely different experience. It’s quite different than how we do things in the States where we have a lock down and people actually stay out of the streets and the sidewalks, and we can close it off. Why is this crazy lazy heading toward me?!” I kept thinking, “We should keep that in the shot because that was a perfect reaction.” It was almost like guerrilla shooting, just a balls-to-the-wall situation. We just walked up smack in the middle of that and started shooting. I did a show called The Glades for a few years down in Florida. But because it was just our little group, we were like children. A portion of Wednesday’s Blindspot was shot on location in Bangkok, Thailand, where the nefarious Shepherd (Michelle Hurd) seeks to obtain nuclear materials for Phase 2 but ends up landing in some trouble of her own. until like 6:30 p.m. It was just so fun! I was a kid in a candy store. I remember we were chasing daylight, because we were doing all exteriors and we had from the a.m. We’d go, “Okay, watch out! It’s always so interesting when you get to a different place and you haven’t been climatized. I was literally running through the streets of Bangkok. We had a complete skeleton crew from here: It was me, David Johnson, our DP, Chris Place, who directed [our unit for] the episode, and Ryan Johnson, the writer/producer. At the weekends, we’d go and have meals, listen to music or do whatever. We’re about to run! Should we check with the doctor?” because I was just not climatized to it, and it was 90 degrees and 90 percent humidity every single day. Blindspot airs Wednesdays at 8 p.m. You’re like walking and it’s like, “Oh, I’m sorry, there’s a motorcycle just going through at full speed,” nobody pauses or thinks it’s strange. That’s where I live, I’m walking through anyway!” We’re obnoxious that way. to try to get all the shots in. Hurd takes EW behind the scenes of shooting on location, providing stunning photos that you can find on EW’s Instagram. We were so giddy, we were so excited. I was so giddy and excited, I wanted to do every single stunt I could possibly do. There were a couple times where I was shooting where I’d knock out my stunt people on the way, and I’d run and you could tell there were people in front of me looking at me with huge eyes like, “What is happening? I’ll do that!” It was really, really a one-of-a-kind experience and really fun.

Ava DuVernay delivers touching tribute to her aunt at Time 100 gala

“When I was asked to give this toast to someone who has influenced me, there was only one person who came to mind,” DuVernay said of her aunt, Denise Amanda Sexton, crediting her aunt with inspiring parts of her career. Acclaimed film director and TIME 100 member Ava DuVernay honored her aunt during an inspiring toast at the Time 100 gala. Her narrative and documentary work has touched upon the history of racism in America. DuVernay said that although Sexton passed away, she’s with the director every day. DuVernay has frequently spoken out about institutional racism, sexism and how Hollywood excludes people of color. “I understand fully through Denise that influence is a privilege that depends on people giving it to you.”
This article originally appeared in Time.com

Show Full Article She also became the first black woman to direct a film with a budget of more than $100 million with A Wrinkle in Time, set to come out in 2018. “She opened my window to the world, which for me was the image cinema,” she said.“We’d take the bus to the movies, and we’d see the movie, and then we’d talk and talk and talk and talk about it afterwards, which for a little girl is a big deal when someone just talks to you.”
DuVernay, director of Academy Award-nominated films Selma and 13th, is the first black woman to be nominated for a best director Golden Globe.

‘Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.’: Aida’s true plans revealed

Aida’s ultimate plans were revealed during Tuesday’s episode of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. “She wants to be able to make her own decisions and, maybe more importantly, to actually feel these things that she’s been forced to emulate her whole existence. Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Show Full Article Read at your own risk! “She wants free will,” executive producer Jed Whedon tells EW. Because Aida (Mallory Jansen) cannot kill humans due to her built-in parameters, she plans to use the Darkhold-powered machine that creates matter out of nothing to make a living body, ostensibly allowing her to be human. races to escape the Framework (more scoop on that next week). ET on ABC. “Once the Framework — which seems to have been a safe place for her to live and be with Fitz — is penetrated, it feels to me like she is going to use whatever she needs to use in either or both worlds to get what she wants,” Clark Gregg teases. She’s been observing human behavior and trying to emulate it, but unable to actually feel these things.”

But the real question is whether Aida will actually be able to achieve her goal as Team S.H.I.E.L.D. airs Tuesdays at 10 p.m. — and it’s safe to say she’s planning to create a monster. Warning: This story contains major spoilers from Tuesday’s episode of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Jeff Goldblum returning to franchise for ‘Jurassic World 2’

Jurassic World 2 is opening the park to a familiar face. Show Full Article Jurassic World stars Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard have also been reenlisted for the “darker” and “scarier” sequel. Now, 20 years after that movie, Goldblum is joining the   fifth film in the franchise — he sat out Jurassic   Park III and   2015’s franchise reboot   Jurassic   World   — which will be helmed by A Monster Calls director J.A. Having barely survived the events of the first film, he served   as the main protagonist in Steven Spielberg’s massive follow-up. Ian Malcolm in 1993’s   Jurassic Park and its 1997 sequel The Lost World, is returning to the franchise, EW has confirmed. Jeff Goldblum, who starred as Dr. The actor starred as the cocky mathematician, who was one of the first to lay eyes on the original Jurassic Park attraction. THR first reported the news. Bayona. RELATED:   Jeff Goldblum reacts to shirtless Jurassic Park meme
Back grappling with dinosaurs and having once again fought   aliens in last year’s Independence Day: Resurgence, Goldblum will add superheroes to his adversary list in this fall’s Thor: Ragnarok, where he plays the manipulative Grandmaster.

‘Prison Break’ revival kills off original cast member

“It felt fitting in a way that he had tried to turn his life around and goes down in the line of duty doing what he thinks is right,” Adelstein says. ET on Fox. “It felt like a bonus to even get to go back and do Kellerman,” the actor says. At this point, it seems like all fingers point at him.”
Prison Break airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. “When they booked me, they booked me to do two episodes, so I knew how many episodes it would be,” Adelstein tells EW. The end of Tuesday’s episode revealed a big clue when Sara’s new husband Jacob (Mark Feuerstein) was seen meeting with Poseidon’s henchmen. Read at your own risk! “Despite the direness of his situation there at the end, it’s Prison Break, and it is a world in which people narrowly escape death and sometimes don’t escape death but still end up reconstituting somehow. “No one knows if there’s going to be more Prison Break in general, so while it was disappointing for the character maybe to be dead, it’s a cherry on top to even get to go back and do more, so I try not to be too greedy about it.”
Still, filming what might   have been Kellerman’s last hurrah was an emotional experience for Adelstein. “Kellerman was getting too close. I certainly hope that if there’s more Prison Break, there’s more Kellerman, because it’s such a joy to do.”

Whether Kellerman returns in the future or not, Adelstein believes his fate at the hands of a hired gun — what the character was in the original — was apropos. “I thought I had put Kellerman away for good. “On some level, once you start finding things out, once somebody gets too close to the truth, they either have to reveal that truth, or they have to die,” executive producer Paul Scheuring says. He knew too much at that point, so he needed to die.”
Of course, Prison Break has killed off cast members before only to bring them back — Sara (Sarah Wayne Callies), for one, but also, obviously, Michael Scofield (Wentworth Miller). I went in my garage and dug through my stuff to find his pin, his sunglasses, and his ring, put the suit back on, and it really felt nostalgic to do it, so thinking that might be my last day was a little sad, but then again, I already thought I had had my last day.”
Kellerman’s death was part and parcel of making sure the stakes in the revival were real. Is Jacob complicit? Though it momentarily seemed that former villain-turned-ally Kellerman had turned back to the dark side and was somehow the season’s big bad, a rogue CIA operative code-named Poseidon, Paul Adelstein’s character was actually revealed to be a good guy — well, momentarily, at least, and then he was (apparently) killed by one of Poseidon’s henchmen. Warning: This story contains major spoilers from Tuesday’s episode of Prison Break. “That’s clearly the insinuation,” Scheuring says. “If I had my druthers, he certainly wouldn’t be [dead],” Adelstein says. Show Full Article A stalwart character from Prison Break‘s original run paid the ultimate price during Tuesday’s episode. “I like blood, I like characters dying, and more characters will die over the course of the season,” Scheuring says. “Episode 5 is going to answer a lot of questions. “He was certainly not above that kind of betrayal earlier in his career, so there was something fitting about it.”
However, Kellerman won’t be the only fatality by revival’s end. So, who is actually the villain, the man who somehow brought Michael back from the dead and enlisted him for nefarious plans in the Middle East?

John Legend says Donald Trump is ‘corrupt’ and ‘a terrible president’

“He’s manifestly unqualified, not curious, not good at legislating or doing anything that his job requires.”
Legend, who also performed at the event, says he felt it was his responsibility as an artist to entertain and inspire people, but also to “try to reflect what’s going on in the world in a way that helps bring us closer together.”
RELATED: 30 Stars Who Spoke Out Against Donald Trump
The singer went on to list his wife, Chrissy Teigen, as well as Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye among those he admires and emulates, but sadly didn’t see any of his heroes’ qualities in POTUS. I think he’s one of the worst people I’ve ever encountered in public life.”
GALLERY: See Photos From the TIME 100 2017 Red Carpet Gala
When asked what he considered the least bad thing President Trump has done in his nearly first 100 days in office, Legend responded, “We haven’t gotten in a nuclear war…yet.”

Show Full Article “I think he’s a terrible president,” the singer and activist told reporters on the red carpet. “He doesn’t have any depth about any subject and he’s also using the office of the presidency as a way to make money for himself with his business, so he’s corrupt,” he said. “I can’t say anything nice about the guy. John Legend was among those honored at Tuesday night’s Time 100   gala as one of the most influential people in the world, and while he had plenty of positive things to say about the greatest influences in his life, he didn’t pull any punches when it came to talking about someone on the opposite end of his spectrum: President Trump.

‘Suits’ brings in Dule Hill for season 7

The Psych alum   has joined the cast of Suits   ahead of the legal drama’s seventh season, EW has confirmed. Hill starred for eight seasons on the detective dramedy Psych, and his other screen credits include The West Wing, Ballers, and the upcoming movie Sleight. Adams) finally operating as   a bona fide lawyer   and   rejoining the   Pearson Specter Litt team as they continue adjusting to the absence of   Jessica Pearson (Gina Torres). Hill will portray play Alex Williams, a   longtime   friend of Gabriel Macht’s Harvey   and   a senior partner at a rival law firm. Dulé Hill is   suiting up for a   USA Network homecoming. Season 7 of Suits, which kicks off July 12, will pick up with protagonist   Mike Ross (Patrick J. The Hollywood Reporter first reported Hill’s casting. Show Full Article

‘Genius’: Geoffrey Rush wants an Albert Einstein emoji

Download the free app on your Smart TV, mobile, and web devices. Show Full Article If Geoffrey Rush has his way, he’ll also be an emoji. “He’s like an emoji,” said Rush. The Pirates of the Caribbean alum is channeling the famous physicist in the NatGeo series Genius, and during an upcoming appearance on Entertainment Weekly: The Show, he found an interesting way to describe Einstein. Watch the video above and check out   Entertainment Weekly: The Show   on the new   People/Entertainment Weekly Network (PEN). ET on NatGeo. Because that’s what people kind of know — they know the hair, they know the famous shot when he [sticks tongue out] did that for the paparazzi at some point.”
Genius premieres Tuesday at 9 p.m. Albert Einstein was a genius, scientist, and mathematician. “And I’m going to write to the emoji people and say, ‘Look, you’re really missing one,’ because I want to use it to sign off on my texts.

‘The Mick’ blog: Sofia Black-D’Elia on the breast implants episode

John and Dave Chernin, our showrunners, actually called me when they first had the idea for this one, and said, “Are you okay with this, or are you going to have a heart attack when you sit down at the table read?” [Laughs.] And I said, “I just want it to be funny, and I don’t want it to be judgmental. —As told to Ariana Bacle
The Mick   airs Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. I thought it really should be about the comedy of it between Sabrina and Mickey and less of a comment. I thought it would get in the way of it being funny and me being able to buy into it in a real way if it was judgemental in either way — if it was to say, “Oh, all young girls should be able to do this!”   or   “It’s terrible for any young girl to do this!” That’s not the kind of show we make, and that’s not the kind of show that I want to make necessarily. “Mickey,” who’s   tasked with caring for her on-the-lam sister’s three children — is taking EW behind the scenes of the latest episode. Every girl is different and has their own brain and should be able to decide what they want to do. ET on Fox. This week, star Sofia Black-D’Elia goes inside the 16th episode, “The Implant,” in which Sabrina considers getting breast implants. I decided to do it early,” not thinking that anything is weird or wrong with that. This episode starts with Sabrina going to Mickey and saying, “Hey, for my 18th birthday, I was going to get implants. As long as those two things are true, I’m really excited.” And they’re like, “We feel the same way.” I was pretty stoked; I thought it was really funny. I think they were really great about asking me and Kaitlin along the way, “Does this check out?” They’re pretty good that way. And it’s about Mickey saying, “Well, if that’s really something that you want to do, we should take them for a test drive,” and, so of course, it becomes a very ridiculous outing for the two of them. Every week, the cast and crew of Fox’s   The Mick   — the comedy series that follows Kaitlin Olson‘s reckless Mackenzie, a.k.a. They were so sensitive right from the jump about this topic and understanding that they’re men and maybe don’t know all the ins and outs of why a girl would do it and why she wouldn’t. Show Full Article

‘Six Degrees of Separation’: EW stage review

“Film is a different medium,” Ouisa sighs. Nearly 30 years after John Guare’s drama premiered, the most absurd (and absurdly funny) thread isn’t that a clutch of wealthy Manhattanites were hoodwinked by a sweet-talking stranger claiming to be Sidney Poitier’s son; it’s that he promised them all parts in the movie version of Cats   — and they were thrilled. In the span of 90 minutes, Ouisa goes from talking about touring South Africa to see super-poor people to promising Paul that she’ll take him under her wing, teach him, and love him. As for the rest of Guare’s delicious social satire, it’s aged nearly as well as the Cats quips — far better than you’d expect, considering that the title phrase is now firmly entrenched in our vernacular. If there’s one thing to be learned from the beautifully unsettling Broadway revival of Six Degrees of Separation it’s this: There’s no expiration date on a Cats joke. “You went to Cats. On the outside, she is polished and buffed and shined to perfection — not a hair out of place in that shellacked East Side matron bob; but inside, she’s “a collage of unaccounted-for brush strokes.” In an argument with Flan, she asks him this question — one that I suspect Guare wants us all to ask ourselves: “How much of your life can you account for?” Three days later, I still don’t have my answer. But there’s plenty of profundity as well. She’s no longer content with her high-stakes art-dealer husband. “I am bound to everyone on this planet by a trail of six people,” says Ouisa. You said it was an all-time low in a lifetime of theater-going,” spits Tess (Colby Minifie) accusingly to her parents, Louisa, aka Ouisa (six-time Emmy winner Allison Janney, absolutely sublime) and Flanders, aka Flan (The Normal Heart Tony winner John Benjamin Hickey). “It’s a profound thought.” (Side note: Does anyone still play the resultant pop-culture parlor game “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon”?)

The way that Ouisa and Flan — and their friends — get fooled by Paul (Straight Outta Compton’s Corey Hawkins, appropriately mysterious), the faux Poitier, provides plenty of comic fodder: a face-off with a hyperactive naked hustler; the appearance of assorted sullen, rancorous college-age children (sample insult: “Dad, sometimes it is so obvious to me why Mom left”); the suspicious delivery of a pot of jam. A-

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Ross Butler’s role on ‘Riverdale’ to be recast for season 2

The recurring role on the CW drama has been played by Ross Butler, who stars as Zach on 13 Reasons Why. The role of Reggie, Archie’s (KJ Apa) long-time   frenemy, is set to be recast for the already ordered season 2, EW has confirmed. A new actor will be cast due to Butler’s availability. I’m just crossing my fingers.”
Riverdale airs Thursdays on the CW at 9 p.m. “I’m hoping for a second season,” Butler previously told EW. The move fuels speculation that Butler’s popular Netflix series will return for a second season. While many believe the story has reached a natural end, Butler and his costars have expressed their desire to continue. Looks like there’ll be a new face in Riverdale next season. “We love what Ross did with the role of Reggie [this season], but because of his commitments to other projects, we couldn’t use him nearly as much as we would have liked,” series creator Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa said in a statement to TVLine, which first reported the news. Show Full Article ET. “I think there’s so much more to tell.

‘OITNB’ honors Poussey with murals painted around the world

“She’s a fictional character that can elicit real change in thought and action from people.”
Check out the portraits below:
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Orange Is the New Black returns for its fifth season, which takes place over the course of three intense days, on June 9. Ahead of the fifth season premiere of Orange Is the New Black,   Netflix has commissioned artists around the world   to paint portraits   of Samira Wiley’s character, whose upsetting death at the hands of a prison guard at the end of the fourth season sparked a prison riot (which will drive the forthcoming season). “To see an African-American woman on the wall in Detroit, blown up huge, with the words ‘Stand Up’ — it’s just so empowering, and that’s what I wanted everyone to feel when they see the mural,” said Tanguay. Show Full Article For a   first look at season 5, click here. Each mural will be emblazoned with the slogan “Stand Up,” and   OITNB fans will be able to see them in New York (Anthony Mast), Los Angeles (Tewsr), Toronto (Ness Lee), Melbourne (Elle), Sydney (Vexta), Chicago (Max Sansing), Detroit (Michelle Tanguay), and San Francisco (Amanda Lynn). Poussey Washington may be gone, but she’s definitely not been forgotten. “I viewed this project as paying tribute to the character… I wanted to make it very positive, and that’s why I chose the bright colors, the bright blues, to just do her justice.”
Viewers can find Tanguay’s 24-by-25 feet portrait painted on a brick wall at the corner of Broadway Street and Grand River Avenue in Detroit. The murals were created by local artists who were fans of the show and were simply asked to bring their own perspective to the beloved character. Wiley can next be seen on Hulu’s   The Handmaid’s Tale, which premieres Wednesday. “I think it’s our responsibility as artists to be able to reflect the time that we’re living in,” Wiley, who’s proud that the campaign nods to the recent instances of African-Americans being killed in police custody,   told the AP. “I want to do the character justice and do the show justice because I think they have so many strong messages that are really relevant today,” Tanguay told the Associated Press, which first broke the news.

Gretchen Carlson penning book on sexual harassment and women’s empowerment

Together we can make change.”
Be Fierce   will be supported by a national media and book signing tour and is available for pre-order now. A   veteran broadcast journalist, mother of two, and former Miss America, Carlson made headlines last summer   when she   sued her former Fox News boss, Roger Ailes, for sexual harassment, setting the wheels in motion for his eventual exit from the company. (Ailes denied the allegations, and Carlson reached a settlement with Fox News in September.)

In a statement about her new book, Carlson said, “Make no mistake —   sexual harassment is not just about sex. Sexual harassers feel they can get away with it because they believe they’re the ones holding all the cards. It’s really about power. 26 from Hachette’s Center Street Books, the imprint announced Tuesday. Carlson’s book will encourage women to fight against   harassment and abuse in every   aspect of their lives,   from schoolyard bullying to the gender pay gap. Former Fox News host   Gretchen Carlson is putting pen to paper for a book   on   sexual harassment and women’s empowerment. Be Fierce:   Stop Harassment and Take Your Power Back   is slated   for release Sept. Be Fierce   will also feature   a playbook to help women and men better understand and combat harassment in the workplace. Show Full Article We need to encourage women to stop being silent, stand up and speak up, and join the movement. It doesn’t occur to them that the women they’re harassing have power too.