Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson break down ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ trailer

“They’re really badly taken care of and they’re called donkeys,” he said, adding that one of Caesar’s goals is to free them. Listen to more secrets direct from the stars in the video above. Show Full Article “So, I think in the Colonel’s mind, he’s doing a good thing, he’s not just a killer.”

Serkis also pointed out that there are “turncoat apes,” apes who work for the humans as slaves. War for the Planet of the Apes, directed by Matt Reeves, brings out a darker side of Caesar, as he sets off on a path that’ll lead him to a showdown with the Colonel for the fate of both   species. If you saw   the new trailer for War for the Planet of the Apes, you can now watch it again   with stars Andy Serkis and Woody Harrelson breaking down its secrets. Steve Zahn, Amiah Miller, Karin Konoval, Judy Greer, and Terry Notary also feature among the cast. Though he didn’t want to get into spoilers around the mysterious young girl in the film, EW previously revealed her to be a character from the original, Nova. The actors — playing Caesar and the   Colonel, respectively — walked IGN through the new footage of   the battle for dominion of earth. “The Colonel has a gang of soldiers who are searching for these apes and intent on killing them, intent on exterminating them with the purpose of saving humanity,” Harrelson said. The film hits theaters on July 14. “Since the end of Dawn, [Caesar’s]   been coping with the fact that they are, everybody’s at   their wit’s end,” Serkis explained. “The humans are under attack, the apes are under attack, and it’s reached a critical point where things are dire.”
According to the actor, the opening moments   of the trailer take place when Caesar and his apes go in search of the Colonel, the ruthless leader of the human forces. There has been “suffering on both sides,” he added.

‘Big Little Lies’ director teases what to expect from the high-stakes finale

Who is hurting little Amabella (Ivy George)? to 6 a.m. “Everything moves forward to the resolution,” says Vallée, who is already knee-deep in his next HBO project, the adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s Sharp Objects, starring Amy Adams. Still, Vallée is excited for the audience to experience the finale, which we will dissect after you’ve all watched it Sunday evening. There are a lot of different scenarios and that was the beauty of the writing. And will Madeline (Reese Witherspoon) reveal her affair to Ed (Adam Scott)? French-Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallée has a lot to resolve in Sunday’s finale of HBO’s much buzzed-about miniseries,   Big Little Lies. “It’s really difficult to see a guy beating the s— out of a woman,” says Vallée. Or maybe it will be between Ed and Nathan (James Tupper). For the musical performances, Kravitz’s Bonnie does a mean rendition of an Elvis classic while Ed and Nathan do some serious lip-syncing. “It was two weeks of shooting through the night from 8 p.m. Will Perry retaliate? Will Jane (Shailene Woodley) get her revenge? Witherspoon chose Hepburn’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s white bib tuxedo shirt and satin blue sleeping mask while Kidman chose the classic black dress with the pearl necklace and gilded updo from the same film. There’s lip-syncing to tackle and Audrey Hepburn garb to display, not to mention a murder victim and a murderer to unveil. (Yes, that is Dern in the brown Hepburn wig from the series’ intro.)
Vallée says he let all the actresses work directly with the costume designer to create their Hepburn look, while he directed the men on what to wear. “It’s tough emotionally but Nicole and Alex just did it. “The fun part was putting in all these tricks. Valle admits shooting the final act — a 20-minute drama fest — was the toughest thing he’s ever done. And this is the guy who followed Witherspoon up a mountain as the director of Wild. Who is Ziggy’s (Iain Armitage) father? It’s a lot to dissect in only one hour of television, but Vallée assures us that all those big and little lies will be uncovered. Like when Renata (Laura Dern) says to Gordon (Jeffrey Nordling), ‘I want to kill her.’ Maybe it’s all between Renata and Madeline. to capture all these different perspectives,” he says. Until then, he keeps his analysis succinct: “I think it’s great.”

The finale of   Big Little Lies airs Sunday at 9 p.m. Of course, as you can see from the promo above, the violence between Celeste and Perry also comes to a head, and that’s after a series of domestic beatings that has already taken a toll on both the audience and the performers. Plus, we have some outstanding questions that need to be answered: Will Celeste (Nicole Kidman) finally leave Perry (Alexander Skarsgard)? That didn’t diminish the difficulty of the scenes. Or maybe between Bonnie (Zoë Kravitz) and Madeline. on HBO. They didn’t complain,” says Vallée, who explains that when the action turned really violent, production would shoot the scene first with her stunt double so Nicole could watch the action play out. I just followed the plan.”
RELATED: Reese Witherspoon’s Best Instagram Moments
Of course, the climax to the series will be Otter Bay Elementary’s big Trivia Night, a fancy gala where the ladies are all dressed up as their favorite version of Audrey Hepburn while the men are clad in their best Elvis Presley attire. Show Full Article

‘Pirates of the Caribbean 5’: Orlando Bloom resurfaces in new promo

McNally, Golshifteh Farahani,   Stephen Graham, and David Wenham. We also see him stretching out an arm to someone, who looks to be   Brenton Thwaites’ character, Henry, recently confirmed by another teaser   to be Henry Turner. Watch the promo above. When last we caught up with Will in the third film, At World’s End, his heart had been carved out and placed in the   Dead Man’s Chest, forcing him to succeed Davy Jones as captain of the Flying Dutchman. Elizabeth Swan (Keira Knightley) was last seen waiting on shore with their young son for Will’s return,   and now   he’s back   at sea — with some crustacean acne of his very own. Disney unveiled a new promo for Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, which sees the return of Orlando Bloom’s William Turner after he was briefly glimpsed in an earlier trailer. The   captain of the Flying Dutchman has resurfaced. Show Full Article The film opens in theaters on May 26. The phantom ship, meant   to ferry dead souls at sea into the world beyond, only docks on land once every 10 years. That accounts for the film’s Game of Thrones-esque new mantra: “All pirates must die.”
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, directed by   Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg, also stars   Geoffrey Rush,   Kevin R. Elsewhere in the footage, we see more of Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow running from Captain Salazar (Javeir Bardem), a ghostly and vengeful figure   looking to exterminate as many pirates as he can.

All the tweets Lin-Manuel Miranda and Sarah Michelle Gellar sent each other this week

When star Sarah Michelle Gellar posted an image of one of the variant covers, she got a quick response from her new Twitter buddy Lin-Manuel Miranda. To read more on the Buffy the Vampire Slayer   reunion, pick up the new issue of   Entertainment Weekly on stands now, or buy it   right here. pic.twitter.com/kgi8AeKDN6
— Sarah Michelle (@SarahMGellar) March 30, 2017

@SarahMGellar @EW never pic.twitter.com/BvSdxsGmHJ
— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) March 31, 2017

@Lin_Manuel @EW pic.twitter.com/betmzcnbJ6
— Sarah Michelle (@SarahMGellar) March 31, 2017

@SarahMGellar @EW pic.twitter.com/aFeyeIadZL
— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) March 31, 2017

Show Full Article Check out the majesty below. Miranda and Gellar tweeted GIF   after GIF at each other, using mostly   Buffy   moments   but also Miranda’s appearance on   Carpool Karaoke   and so on. The   Hamilton   maestro tweeted a GIF of Willow (Alyson Hannigan) saying, “How lovely to see you again.” Things really took off from there. RELATED:   Buffy the Vampire Slayer Reunion Exclusive   Photos

The Chosen One @EW pic.twitter.com/g2h0htcM7g
— Sarah Michelle (@SarahMGellar) March 29, 2017

@SarahMGellar @EW pic.twitter.com/dsF9YGpe2C
— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) March 29, 2017

@Lin_Manuel @EW pic.twitter.com/qRTUiNQGVb
— Sarah Michelle (@SarahMGellar) March 29, 2017

@SarahMGellar @EW pic.twitter.com/k7twB0qpYG
— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) March 30, 2017

@Lin_Manuel @EW Don't be sorry "sometimes I get over excited" pic.twitter.com/aICWFxWdja
— Sarah Michelle (@SarahMGellar) March 30, 2017

@SarahMGellar @EW pic.twitter.com/iMqN1UYXsn
— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) March 30, 2017

@Lin_Manuel @EW You flatter me pic.twitter.com/PdW0NttKUg
— Sarah Michelle (@SarahMGellar) March 30, 2017

@SarahMGellar @EW Ya caught me pic.twitter.com/ZEJcU5oeB6
— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) March 30, 2017

@Lin_Manuel @EW Ok?!? You aren’t   the only one impressed by EW’s new cover story reuniting the cast of   Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Don’t forget to   subscribe for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW.

James Blunt riffs on ‘You’re Beautiful,’ Ed Sheeran, and Donald Trump

I’m tickled. I must speak to my manager. Would it make your day if he called you “FAKE MUSIC!”? There was a whole lot of press about Al Yankovich’s parody [“You’re Pitiful]. I’m so over that. So for him to accuse her of misjudging that is desperation. It was three in the morning, and at that time of night, I didn’t really care. I’m the first one to say that I sold out   years ago. I try not to tell them too much about it. In the   new song “Heartbeat,” you sing, “I would go back in a heartbeat/Just to make your heart beat.” Did you consider rhyming anything else with “heartbeat” besides, you know, “heart beat”? They know exactly how to handle a sword. The Afterlove has a   song titled   “Don’t Give Me Those Eyes.” Were you worried that it   might be co-opted by the anti-organ donor movement? Can the 43-year-old musician   hit all the right notes in his answers to a few Stupid Questions? What’s the meanest review you ever received? What was the single worst pun you heard off that song title? They do look different. And I can prove it’s not true. Where do you keep it? Was there perhaps a   multivitamin version of the song called “You’re Chewable?”
Is that a thing? And I think what he really understood   —   which is what many people haven’t understood fully — is that “You’re Beautiful” is not a romantic song. That’s generally how I entertain myself. This is something I lose sleep over. A more inspiring lyric which is in the first single, called “Love Me Better,” I’ve actually rhymed the word “things” with “things.” Which I don’t believe you will find anyone else has ever done. But recently, my university asked me to come back and made me a doctor, so now more than ever it’s become a nightmare that people are really just after my engineering skills. I just thought you’d do. My job was to keep them there… Ooh! It’s basically their only job. What were you thinking about? If you guys feel the need, you should probably send me out to Iraq and Syria to try to sing ISIS into submission. Death by lighting your own farts. Well, I think anyone who has worked in the military will be able to tell you that I’ve been a very useful weapon in singing people into surrender—and I would like to offer my services now. You were posted to the Household Cavalry Regiment in London and even guarded the Queen. okay, cool, whatever.” And I’d go, repeat it, “My life is brilliant,” and he’d go, “You said that.” And he’d just cut in through the song and it was the most amazing parody. There are so many bad reviews that if what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, then I’m Mr. So, taking on that theme, for this album, I seriously considered changing my name to J. I think I was more excited to find out when I first came to the States that blunt is actually something you smoke to get high. We need it to be shorter than “If Ed Sheeran Hadn’t Gotten In the Way, I’d Be a F—ing Knight By Now.” [considers several options, then]   “Slash Me ToKnight.”
How often do you tap Ed on the shoulder and when he turns around, it’s Rupert Grint? You’ve sold 20 million albums. So, how does this   work — do we   just back up the Grammy truck now into your driveway, or do you still have to wait? Did the standoff finally end when you said, “I have a crazy idea,” and you played your guitar and sang gently, which was met with silence, before one Russian soldier began nodding along, and then suddenly, everyone there was arm in arm, singing in perfect “We Are the World” harmony? Yes, I can. Blunt. And also, he said he went to the hospital and he was stitched up and he came back within an hour, but everyone in England knows that our waiting queues are way longer than that. I’m really sorry to tell you, but I had my beer goggles on. I can’t see you right now as we’re on the phone, but is there any chance you are singing wistfully in the rain whilst slowly removing your clothes and making lots of numbed-out eye contact? Has any critic ever claimed to “suffer Blunt trauma to the head”? Gisela Schober/Getty Images
Can you think of a cooler/dumber rock-star demise than death by mock-knighting? I was drunk at the time. So I think that maybe we missed the point. Actually, most of them were just bought by my mother. You can pick out some of that in the lyrics of the new songs. It costs tens of thousands of dollars. I’m this kind of Blunt weapon that you’ve got to use. In my downstairs loo with a letter from the Queen and the pictures of me being made Dr. And where do you fall, by the way? James Blunt — the singer-songwriter you can thank (and blame) for   “You’re Beautiful,” Twitter comeback king, and former reconnaissance officer in the British army   —   has returned with a new album, The Afterlove, which features a pair of   tracks co-written with   his pal Ed Sheeran. Well, I’m not sure about my head size, but I think a 2-percentile body. Do you ever worry that women don’t really care about your fame and money and music, and they only want to sleep with you because you studied aerospace manufacturing engineering in college? We have a very large warehouse in our garden, so if you ever can’t find one in the shop, call her. I was extremely concerned about how painful it would be on my balls. Firstly, Princess Beatrice is fifth in line for the throne. I’m sure   the statute of limitations has passed. A lot of stories out there say that you’ve won the Internet with your Twitter comebacks. It looks like a Jimi Hendrix outfit. So when I would say, “My life is brilliant,” he would go, “Oh, yeah. Ed has a different sized head, with more brains. I was just actually starting to write my thank-you speech, but I should hold back. I would definitely do that. There was another part of her body that I was hoping she was going to put on my hand. There was a great parody by Tom Gleeson from Australia, and his parody was that he was the boyfriend of the girl on the subway. I have got a uniform I was supposed to give back. What was the coolest thing you ever stole from Buckingham Palace? Aw, sweet! JAMES BLUNT: I see what you’ve done there. So many people have said that before, I’m not sure that would be entirely original. It’s because I wanted her just simply to give me something more interesting. You did an educational version of “I’m Beautiful” on Sesame Street called “My Triangle.”   Which corporation dangled a ton of cash in front of you to contort this song into a painful pun? I think he used him in a video once. ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Can I be Blunt for a second? Blo. And no one really touched on the point that actually at the end of the day not all parodies are good. In your new song “Someone Singing Along,” there’s a lyric about Donald Trump: “Some people going to build a wall/Then smash it with a cannonball.” What would be the best tweet to get from him? I would describe him as a 90-percentile head, whereas Rupert I would say is probably a 40-percentile head. People play it at their weddings, but I think that’s f—ed up. Ed   Sheeran, whom you’re about to tour with, co-wrote two songs on The Afterlove. Because at the end of the day, I was high on the subway stalking someone else’s girlfriend,   and the boyfriend was there, who by the way was much bigger than me, and I should have really have been at that stage probably arrested and locked up, and yet some people go, “Oh, that’s so romantic!” And I think those people are weird. Or do I maybe not have a good handle on how military conflicts are resolved? If you had to write a song about that experience, what was it be titled? I was the face of a perfume, which we insisted wouldn’t be in any English-speaking countries, so my friends didn’t see it. When you slo-mo-jumped off that platform in the video for “You’re Beautiful,”   you probably had a lot of extra time in the air to reflect before hitting the water. I should make it sound more spontaneous. In 1999, we were headed toward global crisis during a NATO/Russian standoff in Kosovo. Show Full Article They do complain about that, genuinely. Sweet of you to say! Do you really think I’m beautiful or were you just saying that to sell 12 million copies of Back to Bedlam? How many of those were bought by parents for their teenager because they mistook you for James Blake? Nowadays, it’s more like: In my bedroom, wearing women’s underwear, looking at myself in the mirror. But I do really only wear that in my bedroom. I haven’t thought about the song that way! These are professionals. It’s very stalker-y. You know what? Do not underestimate the Blunt force of this man. You were there, serving in the British army under NATO. I’ve done one better than that. They say that every time anyone’s there for tea that all their silver teaspoons get nicked. As you can tell how high-pitched my voice is as a result, it really hurt. Universe.   When you asked Princess Beatrice to knight you as Sir James at a party, she swung back and accidentally cut Ed on the cheek with the sword—
Well, primarily I need to say that Ed Sheeran has made up that story because he is obviously desperate to sell records. That would be amazing if I could. And various awards from small island nations that are of insignificance to the United States.

David Boreanaz was always getting naked on the ‘Buffy’ set

“It was all the time,” says Sarah Michelle Gellar (Buffy Summers). There were plenty of episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer   where her on-again, off-again, sometimes good, sometimes evil boyfriend, Angel (David Boreanaz) was partially undressed. Don’t forget to   subscribe for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. To read more on the Buffy the Vampire Slayer   reunion, pick up the new issue of   Entertainment Weekly on stands now or right here. When Emma Caulfield (who played Anya on the show) asks if he would at least cover himself up with a sock, Gellar exclaims, “No!”
Boreanaz only shrugs and offers a “sorry” with a laugh. But it turns out, whether the storyline required it or not, Boreanaz would get naked on set as often as possible. According to the cast, the actor would just wander onto set in the buff to see what reaction he would inspire. “He would literally come out with no pants on just to see if you could keep a straight face,”   says Gellar. Watch the clip above and catch our exclusive   People/Entertainment Weekly Network (PEN) special,   EW Reunites: Buffy the Vampire Slayer,   here   or download the free app on your favorite device. Adds Charisma Carpenter (Cordelia Chase), “It’s shocking how often he was comfortable being naked and how giggly he is.”
For more revelations from the past four decades of entertainment, visit ew.com/untoldstories. Show Full Article Fans will remember the season 3   episode, “Faith, Trick and Hope,” when Angel returns from hell without any clothing and lies naked on the floor of his gothic mansion. David Boreanaz was no angel on set.

‘It’ trailer sets all-time viewing record, bulldozing ‘The Fate of the Furious’

and New Line shared the new trailer for the big-screen adaptation of Stephen King’s horror classic, racking up more than 197 million views in a single day. (The novel was set in the 1950s, but the film shifts the action to the ‘80s.) When the creature manifests itself as a particularly creepy clown known as Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard), a group of young kids band together to investigate. Thirty-six hours after the trailer’s release, it had reached 246 million views. In addition to dethroning The Fate of the Furious, the It trailer numbers surpass previous records held by the live-action Beauty and the Beast (128 million views), Fifty Shades Darker (114 million), and Star Wars: The Force Awakens (112 million). The creepy new It trailer is leaving The Fate of the Furious in the dust. On Wednesday, Warner Bros. It will creep into theaters on Sept. Those numbers, first reported by Deadline,   shatter the record set by the Fate of the Furious trailer, which was released in December and earned 139 million views in 24 hours. Watch the trailer above, and head here for EW’s frame-by-frame deep dive into the new footage. 8. Adapted from King’s beloved 1986 novel, the new It movie reintroduces the malevolent, shape-shifting force that’s been terrorizing the small town of Derry, Maine. Not only did the It trailer earn more than 81 million views on Facebook alone, but it also blew up Twitter, sparking global trending topics like “Pennywise” and the red balloon emoji. Show Full Article

Beyoncé as Nala in ‘The Lion King’? It could happen

Beyoncé and Jay Z announced in February that she’s pregnant with twins. Donald Glover is   already on board to voice Simba and James Earl Jones will reprise his turn as Mufasa. Lady Gaga will take the reins, with Queen Bey back on top at the festival in 2018. Beyoncé voicing Nala in “The Lion King”? The “Crazy in Love” singer is the director’s top choice to voice Nala, Simba’s lifelong companion/love interest,   in the live-action reboot of the 1994 animated Disney   classic, sources told Variety. (Matt Sayles / Associated Press)Beyoncé   may say yes to voicing the role of Nala in John Favreau’s   remake of “The Lion King,” according   to a report Friday. The production would be willing to accommodate any scheduling needs she might have, Variety said, but its insiders emphasized that Blue Ivy’s mom hadn’t made a decision yet.The pregnancy changed Beyoncé’s   mind about headlining the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival this year, as was planned. Latest updates It could happen.

‘Love Actually’ is all around: Check out the sequel’s cast reunion photo

The movie has its roots in large-cast   classics like Robert Altman’s Nashville and Short Cuts and Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction. Come on, that’s extraordinary.”
For even   more Love Actually, check out the Untold Stories double issue of EW for an oral history   with Curtis and many in his cast, who all take a lovely, lively look back at a movie that its fans know by heart. “But it took on this wonderful following and now it’s almost bigger in America than anywhere else.”

EW’s Love Actually reunion also coincides with Curtis’ own. “I don’t think any of us expected it to become a phenomenon,” says Knightley, one of several actors, along with Nighy and Ejiofor, who became stars in the film’s wake. “It was extremely lovely shooting it, and rather encouraging about human character,” Curtis says. “You assume that people are going to become grumpier with age, but everyone involved was so delightfully sweet.”
For more revelations from the past four decades of entertainment, visit   ew.com/untoldstories. Nowadays it’s commonplace, with underwhelming examples such as Valentine’s Day. Neeson, who appears in the short film alongside his movie stepson, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, now 26, says the charity underscores the goodness in individuals: “We hear about all the s— in the world and then the generosity of people is just mind-blowing. As Hugh Grant said in   Love Actually‘s   opening scene, “Love actually is all around.” That’s surely true for EW’s special Untold Stories issue, in which we reunited   writer-director Richard Curtis and a fair percentage of the cast from the 2003 Christmas movie. Jesus, one billion dollars! Red Nose Day Actually   bowed in the U.K. meant it took a couple of years (thanks to DVD sales and holiday TV airings) before the film acquired modern rom-com classic status. To read more Untold Stories, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly,   on stands now, or buy it here — and   subscribe for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. in March; on May 25 it will air on NBC, with a cameo by Laura Linney that’s exclusive to the U.S. In the photo above, you’ll see (from left) Bill Nighy (Billy Mack), Olivia Olson (Joanna), Thomas Brodie-Sangster (Sam), Liam Neeson (Daniel), Colin Firth (Jamie), Lucia Moniz (Aurelia), Chiwetel Ejiofor, (Peter), Keira Knightley (Juliet), Andrew Lincoln (Mark), Hugh Grant (the Prime Minister), and Martine McCutcheon (Natalie). Mixed reviews and ho-hum box office in the U.S. But   Love Actually, in fact, was not a populist slam dunk. Curtis, who cofounded the charity as a 28-year-old in 1985, has helped   raise more than a billion dollars to help fight poverty and address social issues around the world. biennial Comic Relief jamboree. version. “I was such a great fan of Pulp Fiction, Robert Altman’s films, Woody Allen’s films,   those movies with multiple story lines that crisscross each other,” says Curtis, whose script   for   Four Weddings and a Funeral   competed against Pulp Fiction for the Best Original Screenplay Oscar   in 1995. Show Full Article That template hadn’t really been applied to the romantic-comedy genre. As you’ve probably heard, he regrouped some of the movie’s cast for Red Nose Day Actually, a mini-sequel which aired as part of the U.K.

‘S-Town’ producer Julie Snyder: Don’t call it the next ‘Serial’

The podcast begins with an Alabama man named John B. While the narrative podcast, which released   all seven of its episodes this week, begins with what seems to be a murder mystery, the story quickly shifts gears and heads   in unexpected directions. It wasn’t strategic, it was more editorial. It doesn’t have a genre. Because it’s not Sarah, it seemed like this is it’s own thing. I guess there’s not much for me to say about it right now. In fact, there’s not really a genre that best fits   S-Town, the latest addictive series from the creators of Serial and This American Life. I didn’t feel like there was anything added by waiting a week in between for this story because it has such a different aesthetic and a different feel. Basically, Serial is one serialized story told over chapters. Come on, how about one hint? From the time   John first made contact with producer/host Brian Reed, it took three years   until the podcast was completed. No one wants to see Steven Spielberg just make E.T. I don’t even know what to expect because we’re still really in the mode of reporting and trying to kind of get our feet underneath it. McLemore, who reached out to   This American Life in the hopes of getting the alleged murder of a local boy in his town investigated. When we laid out what would be the reason for making it the third season of Serial, honestly it would’ve been financially beneficial. We often will see people refer to Serial as a true-crime podcast and, for me, we totally do not think of Serial as a true-crime podcast. As long as we’ve kind of got some money to be able to do that, we’re good. You don’t have to wait a week to read a novel. At what point during this process did you know the story was done? About a year ago, we started feeling there was still some reporting to be done but for the most part we felt like the questions we had had been answered. I’m pretty sure I can guarantee that but actually don’t hold me totally to it. Show Full Article In that way, it made more sense to me: Why not do it all at once? What I can say is that I had initially thought that Serial season 3 would be out this summer. I don’t even know what to say. You released all seven episodes, Netflix-style. I don’t know what genre This American Life would even be. Don’t call it Serial season 3, or even a true-crime podcast for that matter. I can guarantee you that is not …well, geez… I think I can guarantee you that that’s not the case. I don’t think anyone would be interested in doing that. Executive producer Julie Snyder spoke to   EW about the reasoning behind   the podcast’s unconventional episode drop, as well as the prospects of   Serial’s next season. I’ve really been on S-Town and Sarah has been doing edits on S-Town and her time has been divided. When S-Town was first announced, many people kept calling it the next season of Serial. It’s always sort of a weird, arbitrary thing to define when a story is done because everybody’s real and they’re still going [on with life]. It felt gross. If we released it all at once, then you can let somebody have their say knowing that in the next chapter, the other person really gets their full thing to say. It’s not Sarah [Koenig], and Sarah’s still working on season 3 right now. And there were even very practical reasons: If we were going to do it week by week, there was a lot of paranoia going on [with the townspeople in the story], so we’d have to structure it differently. It is also really boring. We went back and forth on it for a while. We would’ve been able to charge more for ads and get more advertisers. Was there   a reason behind that? There isn’t one. She’s been really great on it but that means she’s had to pause her work on her Serial reporting. But that’s gross. Those unforeseen jolts are part of what makes S-Town a bingeworthy listen, and what producers hope potential Serial converts   will enjoy. And that to us seemed a lot more freeing in the way we could tell the story. We’ve got two other projects that we’re working on right now but I don’t have release dates for them yet. We had talked about that. Even with Serial, what’s Serial? The last thing we want to do is feel like we’re working in   a genre. It’s not! Because [S-Town] began with a murder investigation, you’re going to have expectations that are set in a way that we’re going to be constantly pushing against. And for me for the last four months, I’m present-ish. It felt like a novel and we had talked about that a lot. Some weeks we do a [This American Life]   show that’s all about the Federal Reserve and the next week we do a show that’s all about coincidences. That was the same thing for S-Town. I’m not interested in doing the same kinds of stories over and over again. And who wants to do that?” says executive producer Julie Snyder. “We don’t need to do that, we don’t have to put ourselves in that position, so why bother? 1. So what can we expect from Serial season 3? Other than that we don’t have really a definition for it. What unfolds is a tale far more complex, one that involves   a tangled web of death, dissension, and a   possible treasure hunt. over and over again. We really had a lot of questions about John and John’s life and and I think, for both Brian and I, [the end] was after he had done several interviews talking to John’s friends. If that’s really the only reason why we’re doing it then, let’s not do that. Serial is whatever we want it to be. What was behind your decision to not make S-Town the third season of Serial? You want to keep on pushing it and trying new things and experiments.

‘There’s Someone Inside Your House’: How the creepy cover was designed

I love the glowing neon pink, which is such an unusual choice for horror. “I’m thrilled with the final cover. That pleases me.”
And here’s our exclusive reveal of the final cover:
Dutton Books
There’s Someone Inside Your House hits shelves September 12. It evokes the creepy factor all on its own.”
Penguin Young Readers
Andrews chose prominent designer Sean Freeman for the job, noting   his portfolio highlights like   the   chilling, smoke-covered   jacket he created for Stephen King’s Doctor Sleep. They placed the stairs in different “rooms” to see how the title would crawl across different surfaces, and experimented with different fonts, light intensities, and colors. “My previous novels were sweet and romantic, so it was crucial to have an honest cover,” Perkins says. It’s automatically unsettling. “We tossed ideas around: pools of dripping blood, unsettling mutated type, type made of shadows… until we finally landed on the idea of playing with light and dark through projections and how that interacts when projected over an object or setting,” Andrews explains. Most of Stephanie Perkins’ readers likely know her for her romantic YA best-sellers like   Anna and the French Kiss   and Isla and the Happily Ever After. “The biggest challenge was to play with the light itself, as any slight little movement distorts the lettering and wraps elements in a whole different way — creating an entirely different scene each time,” Freeman says. “This is a teen slasher. Taking the theme of the “house” from the book’s title, Freeman says they focused on how they could make a cover feel scary   without   showing violence or blood outright. Show Full Article “We considered projecting the title type on the exterior of a house at night, but with the title being quite evocative of someone watching you — we thought the danger felt more imminent and menacing from inside, enhancing the feeling of proximity,” he says. There’s plenty about the writing that still feels like me — the characters, dialogue, an intriguing boy — but there’s also a ton of blood and murder! “We thought the staircase was a good symbol of these rural houses featured in the book, [and] also translated well with this idea of a scary chase in the dark.”
Penguin Young Readers
Instead of designing the cover digitally, Freeman and the team actually   painted and assembled several different wooden miniature staircases on which to project the title. For Perkins, the jacket ended up being exactly right — deceptively appealing, but ultimately disconcerting. I don’t want to mislead readers.”
Lindsey Andrews, cover designer at Penguin Young Readers, says, “We came up with a ton of different possible ideas and directions, but I knew that I wanted the title to be the star. “There were a few options that were very gorgeous and modern and sleek, but they weren’t quite right for this story, which takes place in rural America,” she says. So when it came time to create   the cover for her   newest book, a decidedly not   romantic horror thriller called   There’s Someone Inside Your House,   Perkins and the design team wanted to make a statement.

‘Star Trek: Discovery’ casts ‘Office’ alum as classic villain

Maulik Pancholy, Terry Serpico, Sam Vartholomeos,   Mary Wiseman, James Frain, Doug Jones, and Anthony Rapp   also feature. Wilson will suit up as   Harry Mudd, the eccentric space pirate first played by the late Roger C. The series will kick off on CBS   before subsequent episodes are released on CBS All-Access. Show Full Article What I always loved about Star Trek: the intelligent, thoughtful metaphysical ideas about the human condition… https://t.co/LOu45YqKA2
— RainnWilson (@rainnwilson) December 18, 2015

The Star Trek: Discovery cast includes   The Walking Dead‘s   Sonequa Martin-Green as a lieutenant,   Michelle Yeoh as   Captain Georgiou   of the Starfleet   Shenzhou ship, and   Jason Isaacs as   Captain Lorca. A premiere date is still unclear. Not much is known about Wilson’s take on the character   beyond   the brief descriptor of   a “charismatic conman and intergalactic criminal.”
RELATED: Every Star Trek Movie, Ranked
What makes Wilson’s casting in Discovery even more satisfying is the actor’s love of Trek. Now, he’s getting a taste of the real thing: On   Friday, CBS announced the Office funny guy has landed a role in the forthcoming Star Trek: Discovery, playing someone fans of the original 1960s series will know well. Rainn Wilson’s first big-screen role was an alien fanboy in Galaxy Quest, a movie spoof of cultish sci-fi series like Star Trek. Mudd’s list of offenses include smuggling, transportation of stolen goods, and using counterfeit currency. In 2008, the comedian posed for an   EW photoshoot in which he channeled fictional TV icons, including   Patrick Stewart’s   Jean-Luc Picard from Star Trek: The Next Generation. The character would later appear elsewhere in the franchise, including   the Star Trek animated series and novels. “That’s who I thought I really should play.”
“What I always loved about Star Trek [was] the intelligent, thoughtful metaphysical ideas about the human condition,” Wilson tweeted of the franchise in 2015 when Star Trek Beyond was released. Carmel in the sixth episode of season 1,   dubbed “Mudd’s Women,” which aired in 1966. Steve Granitz/WireImage
“As I was playing Jean-Luc Picard, first of all, I thought I looked like Jean-Philippe Picard, Jean-Luc’s less successful younger brother living in his brother’s shadow, just kind of bitter,” he says in the video above.

‘Buffy’ reunion: Amber Benson talks Tara’s tragic death

That was the genesis of why Tara died. Everett Collection
RELATED:   Buffy the Vampire Slayer Reunion Exclusive   Photos
“Joss   took me aside when we were shooting the finale of season 5,” remembers Benson. It wasn’t in any way shape or form meant to hurt anybody — the opposite.”

Show Full Article It was very much about Willow’s addiction story line and hitting bottom and being like she lost the most important person to her. “They were like, ‘Come back to the trailer, we have exciting news.’ He’s like, ‘We’re going to kill your character!’ I was like, ‘Ohhh, that’s exciting.’ It was never intentional to be offensive to anybody. Don’t forget to   subscribe for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. Willow and Tara’s love story was brought to a vicious halt in season 6 when Tara (Amber Benson) was shot and killed by a stray bullet from Warren (Adam Busch). To read more on the Buffy the Vampire Slayer   reunion, pick up the new issue of   Entertainment Weekly on stands now or available   right here. Her death was shocking to viewers and sent Willow (Alyson Hannigan) down a path of dark magic and revenge.

Kenya Barris reveals why ‘Black-ish’ was once censored

I’m always figuring out ways around how to do this so that makes it hard. To read more Untold Stories, pick up the new issue of   Entertainment Weekly on stands today or right here. ET on ABC. Don’t forget to   subscribe for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. You can also download the PEN app on Apple TV, Roku Players, Amazon Fire TV, Xumo, Chromecast, iOS, and Android devices. In the exclusive video above, watch the duo discuss the challenges of making network-approved television. “They let me tell stories in a way that I appreciate so it’s not a huge argument, but it is a moment of, what? “Those things are corporate arbitrary things,” adds Barris. “I’ve been lucky that ABC’s let me tell some really interesting stories,” begins Barris, “but I get scared when I get those calls and we have to take things out.”
For more revelations from the past four decades of entertainment, visit ew.com/untoldstories. black-ish   airs Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m. Barris, who credits Lear for shaping his approach to the modern network sitcom, met his hero   for the first time years ago, and the pair quickly forged a lasting friendship — Lear has even visited the black-ish writers’ room and pitched Barris a couple of ideas. “One of the images I wanted to show was 9/11 — I wanted to show the towers and I couldn’t show… I was like every kid has seen this.” He adds that a   sign reading   “Sandy Hook Elementary” was also cut from the opening scene. Show Full Article Ultimately, you do have to tell them: ‘I’m going to tell my stories and you can’t.’”
Watch the interview above and head to PEOPLE.com/PEN for more from the   People/Entertainment Weekly Network (PEN). When pressed by Lear to share one silly thing the network has made him change, Barris opens up about a sequence he was asked scale back. “I was doing an episode about talking to your kids about the world that we’re living in and in the cold open I wanted to show images to set a thesis statement over a voiceover,” he says. As part of Entertainment Weekly’s Untold Stories issue, television producer and legend Norman Lear (All in the Family, Good Times, The Jeffersons)   sat down with black-ish creator Kenya Barris to get the scoop on his television making experience.

The behind-the-scenes story of the ‘Donnie Darko’ creepy bunny suit

“I was very adamant that it had to make an impact,” Kelly says. “Everyone asks me, ‘Where did the rabbit come from?’” he says with a laugh. The design may have come to him in a dream, Kelly says, or maybe subconsciously from his longtime love of Watership Down. “There’s tattoos, there’s artwork, there’s sculpture, there’s merchandise, there’s people who do paintings,” Kelly says. To read more Untold Stories, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly,   on stands Friday, or buy it here — and   subscribe for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. It has to make the audience sit up in their seat and have a really intense response.”
Everett Collection
For more revelations from the past four decades of entertainment, visit ew.com/untoldstories. Kelly was only 24   years old at the time, having never directed a feature film before, and he felt himself still trying to earn his crew’s confidence. 11 — but in the years since, the bizarre tale has become an undisputed cult classic. Above all, it’s images of the rabbit   that remain popular, spawning countless Halloween   costumes and T-shirt designs. Even Donnie Darko writer-director Richard Kelly isn’t quite sure how to answer when asked how he came up with the eerie bunny suit for his hallucinatory character, Frank. So I knew it was working, and I felt the sense of relief. The now-cult classic   includes characters played by everyone from Maggie Gyllenhaal and Jena Malone to Patrick Swayze and Seth Rogen, but there’s one face that stands out, even in this eclectic cast of misfits. The director   sketched out Frank’s face himself before the cameras started rolling — some of his initial drawings can be seen in the film’s final “Mad World” montage — and costume designer April Ferry (Game of Thrones) brought Frank to life, building the fur suit herself and recruiting a sculptor to create the twisted grin. Recently, Kelly got a Twitter direct message from   actress/model Paris Jackson (daughter of Michael), who   sent him   a picture of the Frank tattoo on her forearm. “When we brought the rabbit on set, that was a moment where I knew I was either going to live or die by the rabbit and how people responded to it,” Kelly says. Duval wore the Frank suit in almost every single scene on the movie, but on that day, a producer stepped in — and when Frank walked   on set, Kelly could feel the mood change. I could look around, and the makeup artist and the production assistants and the second AD, they were all just really freaked out about it. Show Full Article Steven Poster, my cinematographer, came up to me, and he was like, ‘Rich, I wasn’t sure about the rabbit… but now I get it.’”
Audiences reacted in the same way. Beauty and the Beast co-producer Jack Morrissey collects movie memorabilia, and he currently owns the main mask and suit (photographed by   EW above). “It just continues to be a story and a film that resonates with people.”

Starting Friday, a special 15th anniversary, 4K restoration of   Donnie Darko   will begin playing in select theaters around the country. For screening and location info, head here. James Duval plays Frank, an enormous imaginary rabbit who informs   Donnie that the world is going to end in 28 days. Because Frank doesn’t have to perform   any big stunts or even do much walking in the film, the mask itself has extremely limited visibility. Donnie Darko   was a box office flop when it first hit theaters in October 2001 — a film about a jet engine falling from the sky didn’t seem   particularly palatable in the wake of Sept. “And it’s not an easy question to answer.”
It’s been more than 15 years since Kelly introduced us to the morose Donnie Darko (Jake Gyllenhaal) and his world of airplane engines and Sparkle Motion. “Everyone just got quiet on the set,” he   recalls. (In fact, there’s a scene in the director’s cut of the film where Drew Barrymore shows the film version   of   Watership Down   in her classroom.) One thing that wasn’t an influence was the   other   film about a six-foot rabbit. The first test of that response came early, when the cast and crew got their first glimpse of Frank only a few days into shooting. As for Frank’s current whereabouts? “I’ve still never seen   Harvey,” Kelly admits with a laugh. Even in the earliest drafts of the   script, Frank was always a rabbit. A second   backup mask belongs to Metallica’s Kirk Hammett, who’s apparently a fan of hair-raising hares. “It has to disturb people. “Everyone was like, this is   really   intense.

’13 Reasons Why’ author on ‘bonus content’ the Netflix show adds to his book

So I decided to leave it alone. That was really exciting. It definitely wasn’t the first book I wrote. It started out my character and then we get to see him beyond the book in a way. You get to see the characters interact more than in the book. It was the same thing with the other characters. In the book, it follows him. It’s a weird thing to just bring up out of the blue. They feel like a part of it as well. There was a point where I considered writing somewhat of a sequel, but I decided not to because I felt so many people had such a strong connection to the book that no matter what I did, it would change it a little bit for them. It felt like this is the right way to spread this. Now you can point at something fictional and say, “Has that ever happened to you?” It makes it so easy to have conversations. Even if it’s just, “Has that ever happened?” How do you say something, out of the blue, if you don’t think your kid’s ever been cyber bullied. It would start as my character and in the scene where they’re specifically talking about each of the reasons they’re the same character. But I wanted it to be this very intimate story between Clay and his very immediate reaction to what he’s hearing. Have you spoken to fans who read it when it first came out and have since grown with it? I’ve heard from a lot of parents who say it just provided this way to bond with their child in a way that they hadn’t before. “Are there any other topics or serious issues that you’d love to address?” Looking back, I do think one of the reasons 1Thirteen Reasons Why has been so successful is not because it deals with serious issues, but because I had a unique and interesting way to tell that story. As a guy who wrote the character originally, that was the really fun part for me. They kind of wanted to keep as much as they could. I cannot imagine watching it and having a teenager and not saying, “Okay here are some conversations we have to have.”
Right. Even more adults are going to watch it. It’s one of the things where I wrote the book at the time that I wrote it. [But] then everybody’s expecting the same thing, which is not where my mind naturally goes. A lot of people re-read the book. I cannot not have range. There are lines that aren’t in the book that felt like I could have written that. As the series developed I was excited for the fans. Having seen the show and the storylines of characters dealing with what happens to Hannah after the events, have you played with possibly writing something set in the same world, but maybe 10 years later? Not make it super, super modern feeling, while giving it this old school feel, which they did in certain ways while also being very honest about how things are different now for teens. I have three other books that are all very different. The TV show is its own thing, even though it absolutely honors the book. I knew the issues were going to be dealt with in the book, but I felt my job was to write the story as entertainingly as possible. Thirteen Reasons Why (the book) is available for purchase. Or tackle another hard-to-talk-about subject. Same thing when I hear about a parent reading the book with their child and then discussing it. Did you talk about possibly incorporating more modern technology like that into the show? I read in an interview that you were really anxious as you were writing this book. You were going to get a lot more interactions between Clay and the other characters. No. Seeing Dylan Minnette and Katherine Langford play them, was there anything they added to the characters? You hear so many lines directly from the book and you realize these are the characters from the book. But, of course, that’s the one that sells and becomes big. I’m excited about that. That’s one of the things I’m really excited about with the show. I thought I was going to be known for my humor. That’s evident in the first episode. As they become adults and you see them go to college. ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What do you think is it about TV, as opposed to film, that helps serve this particular story? A lot has changed in the time since. If I were to write it today, it would be a little different. I wanted to keep it basically just the two of them. You definitely see a side of him that you just don’t get to see in the book. But to me, the really beautiful part of this whole thing has been hearing people recommend the book to other people. Obviously, the TV show is going to change the characters because we see more of them, and beyond what’s on the tapes. Honestly, the weird thing was that was my first published book. The book is what it is and exactly how it’s supposed to be but when you have new mediums, you have new opportunities. The second they proposed the series it was a way to completely go around that problem. It still felt like my characters, which is what absolutely impressed me the most. A lot has changed in the 10 years since the book came out, in terms of technology, like Hannah didn’t really have to deal with cyber-bullying. I love that people ask that question. Now that it’s been such a success, do you feel a little more confident as you go into other books? Not only has author Jay Asher has gone on to write two more books and a graphic novel, but the book itself has finally made its way to a screen, with the much-awaited adaptation becoming Netflix’s latest original series. As an author, I love to know my book sells really well. They’re going to get the same 13 reasons and the same characters, but also “bonus content.” You’re getting more storylines involving extra characters. But if you had a favorite character and now they’ve been melded together with another one, it’s disappointing. Whether it’s we became friends on MySpace back then and then you just periodically see them online. Show Full Article It’s an easy way to talk about these things that are otherwise kind of hard to bring up out of the blue. In fact, you can expand. And the adults on the show were saying that. So when the series expanded it, I actually go to see a lot of the repercussions that I originally thought I might write about. Yeah. They’ve had conversations with teens about the book over the years. Do they recommend to other people? When I hear about somebody recommending the book to a friend, even without saying it, I feel like you’re telling that person, “All these issues in the book are things that I’m okay to talk about.” I think you’re really opening yourself up as being a safe person to come to. Of course, it would be smarter to not put out the same thing, but maybe with the same tone. In the TV show, where it takes place over several days, you have more interactions with him and the other characters. Everything I tried to sell before that was humorous. JAY ASHER: What you hear mostly people gripe about adaptations is, “They took out this scene,” or, “They had to condense these characters.” I understand why they have to do that. Beth Dubber/Netflix

Kids are picking up the book even now and becoming fans. [In the show] ideas about Hannah that get spread around because of a photo, which wasn’t in the book because nobody had camera phones back then. Some of the themes I had developed actually somewhat made it into the show, which is really odd. Then when you see the repercussions of the tapes going on, which is not seen in the book, now it’s those characters in scenes I didn’t write. With   13 Reasons Why now available for streaming and the book it’s based on now celebrating its 10th anniversary, EW caught up with Asher to discuss the adaptation, his experience since, and if he ever considered writing a sequel. You only see 24 hours of his character arc. 13 Reasons Why   is streaming on Netflix now. Do they re-read it? It’s weird because it’s just a piece of entertainment but at the same time everybody’s excited about getting the message out too, which is really cool. It’s scary. That’s where the book is written exactly how it needs to be. It still feels so real to me. To see a rumor spread just by words in a hallway is not going to be visually as captivating as it is so it just felt better for TV to do it this way, but also, appropriate because that’s more how it would happen as opposed to how it happened in the book. Or the book would have sounded preachy. You’ve lived with Clay and Hannah in your head for so long. You see Dylan’s character in a way that he’s not portrayed in the book. I was so confident in the people that made it. Let the issues be there naturally. There are definitely issues I’d love to write about, but it has to be a unique way to tell that story that makes it worthy of being a book. At the same time, there’s always been a bittersweet quality for me because I really don’t think the book would have been this successful if the subject matter wasn’t so hard to talk about. But then I had an idea for a story, which was absolutely not humorous. The parents are a bigger part. Some I do keep up with. Order it here. Some of them now married. When the book came out they wrote me something that very much touched me. I felt like I was allowed to be lazy and still have my story continue. It’s been 10 years since   Thirteen   Reasons Why first hit bookshelves—and became the life-saving bestseller it’s known as. The producers and I have talked a lot about that over the years. You don’t have to condense. I’ve actually stayed in contact with a lot of them, which has been weird. He gets the tapes and he listens to all of them by the next morning. Yeah. It’s also just visually much more compelling. One of the really weird things is when I first came up with the idea for the book it was going to be a series, which took place over several days. Even when the book came out it had somewhat of a retro feel because even 10 years ago tapes were outdated. There was a lot of talk of keeping this feel. Over the years that’s been a really great thing.

Watch Will Arnett comment on household appliances in Netflix April Fools’ Day prank

Of course. A puddle? With Netflix Live, you can experience life’s biggest thrills, right from the comfort of your couch.”
The streaming service is no stranger to April Fools’ Day pranks: Last year, Netflix went all out and declared its undying love of John Stamos, covering the entire website with photos and references to the former Full House star. Check. A thumb wrestling match between Adam Sandler and Shannon Purser, a.k.a. Now if you’ll excuse us, we’re going to watch Arnett melodiously narrate footage of the inside of a refrigerator. Have you ever wanted to watch 48 minutes of Emmy nominee Will Arnett narrating footage of a microwaveable burrito? Part zen meditation, part April Fools’ Day joke, Netflix Live bills itself as a live stream of Arnett placidly commenting on random things in front of him. Nothing is safe from Arnett’s thoughtful, incisive commentary. You know it. Fans blowing. Someone writing a boring email? Stream Netflix Live here. Netflix has unveiled its newest original program: Netflix Live. Boy, do we have some great news for you. Grass growing. Show Full Article Barb from Stranger Things? Netflix Live appeared on the service on Friday morning, with the description: “Toasters toasting.

Read ‘Smash’ creator’s essay about being fired from her own show

He’s not necessarily wrong. There was also an architectural problem in the power structure above me. No matter how polite I was, it rocked everyone to the core when the typewriter talked back. Then I fired my lawyer and I fired my manager and I fired my agent. Women should be telling stories. I felt the reality of these definitions strongly once when I was stuck in a traffic jam on Sunset Boulevard going to a meeting. Comfort level, I came to learn, is Hollywood code for men who don’t want to work with women. My son started college; my daughter finished middle school. The saga of what came next is so long and complicated it would take a book to write it all out. Because I hated having it done to me so much, it was not something I took on lightly; I actually tried not to rewrite everything egregiously just because I could. And while I do believe in playing well with others, I ultimately don’t know how to keep my mouth shut. It was a truth he did not want to understand. Spielberg is an enormous force and a great storyteller. All rights reserved. When I think back to that day when I was just walking to rehearsal for a play that paid me next to nothing in a lousy space in Midtown, before my agent called to tell me Mr. Stand up, you stubborn girl. I was the show runner of the first season, which got terrific numbers and established itself immediately as an international sensation. Ooops, did I say that? I didn’t have any fierce need to run my own television show. I wrote two plays. He wants me to take my ambition out of the game and stay out of it. I personally had given up on all that nuttiness by the time I got that phone call from my agent, so many moons ago. One time, I was in a room where one of the guys was pitching a beat in a story. The memory of the pain is pretty vivid. Here is another phrase that I learned: comfort level. It’s truly all you know, and all you want to know. Apparently he needs the money, but trust me, it’s not merely about the money. With permission of the publisher, Liveright Publishing Corporation. God knows I had plenty to do during those years. Or ambition. So I took the job, I wrote the pilot, I created all the characters, I nurtured it through a transition from Showtime to NBC, I produced the pilot, and the show got picked up for an order of seventeen episodes. He threatened to leave me, a couple of times, if I ever went back on staff of another TV show. He felt that the politics had gotten way out of hand, and they wouldn’t have if he had been around more. And they complained, drank too much, fell into despair, and went back to their “real” writing. To successfully run a television show, you have to be a general. Full of myself a little? “I wonder where she got that?” he said. He runs me through one thing and another, and then he gets down to it. Meanwhile, I was still being told that I was unemployable because everyone knew that I was a lunatic. But I was convinced that I had to return to television. One time I asked my daughter Cleo why she was doing something that was getting her in trouble over and over again. I don’t know why I put “real” in quotes; they actually were leaving this nonsense and going back to doing real writing. That means I am    in charge. It may not survive even so. Spielberg was infatuated, mostly what I remember is that I was happy. Money! If I have an ambition, it is to change the world. Most egos don’t behave as well as hers does. But for that first season at least, it was my show and I had the last word and I understood the thrill of that, and the responsibility. By contrast, television writers are quite well paid, although many of them don’t think so because if you spend too much time in Hollywood, you inevitably end up comparing yourself to people who make even more than you do. And that’s the part before you get notes, do rewrites, more notes, more rewrites, then get totally rewritten anyway.” But she started as a playwright and couldn’t get her plays done. With tears streaming down her face, she said to me, “I’m a stubborn girl.” My husband had to stop himself from laughing. “Fun” might be too strong. So I did my job, and I stand by it. Sometimes I try to parse them and fit them all back together; I have been, at times, desperate to figure out what actually happened. Show Full Article Whenever a scene with female characters showed up they would write a card that said, “girl scene here.” Then they would look at me and say, “You’re a woman, you write this.” When I said, “You know where I come from, we write both women and men,” it was considered provocative. Below, EW has an exclusive excerpt of   Rebeck’s explosive essay, in which she details her experience creating the short-lived cult TV show   Smash,   what it’s like being a female showrunner and TV writer in Hollywood, and what happened when she was eventually fired   from her own show without cause. The excitement is heady. Writers of all other genres—fiction, theater, poetry, nonfiction, independent film—generally don’t make much money at all. You don’t keep attacking the show runner; it will bring the show down. I recently found out that one of my favorite novelists wasn’t writ- ing novels anymore because he was trying to get his own show on Showtime. Why would any writer with curiosity and brains and a simple will to tell a decent story put up with b—s— like this? Mircea Eliade writes of the Myth of Eternal Return. But we’ll get to that. When I was fired from the show I created, my soon-to-be-ex-agent told me that the president of NBC had a “comfort level” issue with me. In another room, the guys would sit around and pitch stories, and then write everything down in great detail on little white cards. “It’s unhealthy in general. At this new job, I had to say yes to everything, and I had to prove that I played well with others. That mysterious thing called the Self seems to want to go through the same pain over and over and over again, mystifying itself with the belief that next time, I’ll master it, I’ll control it, I’ll get it right. Double Bind: Women on Ambition   is a new anthology   of essays from prominent   women like essayist and author   Roxane Gay, Molly Ringwald, Smash   creator Theresa Rebeck,   and writer Francine Prose,   with each contributor exploring the way ambition and feminism have influenced her career. Everyone told me the best thing to do was ignore it and put it behind me. Is that just a way of excusing inappropriate desire? “Twelve to fifteen million people hearing my words and seeing characters who they love, and I love expressing my values and my empathy and my humor, I fucking love that. The whisperers had run around and told everyone that I was a lunatic. Back in the day, writers like Clifford Odets, F. Everybody likes each other. Two years later, another net- work gave him another show to run. I was really good at it. The network notes haven’t gotten too crazy; the boys haven’t started acting like jerks yet. Health care! When Steven Spielberg calls your agent to say he is infatuated with your writing, that is a good day. I really like being one of the people who has the privilege of pouring stuff out into the world and hoping it lands and sticks and resonates with whoever’s watching and listening. So my heart says, get up, get back in the game, this isn’t just about you. There’s always a mythic show out there, where they treat the writing staff with respect and shoot the scene the way you wrote it, and it came out great, and the lowly but talented and decent staff writer is vindicated. The network then hired a whole bunch of other people to run it in my stead, and it fell apart, and one year after I had made that show into a bona fide hit, it was canceled. There was a destructive and incoherent madness to it that resists interpretation. This struck him as more than slightly insane. Add    to that fact this: The apprenticeship of television writing is all about having your own ego kicked in the head so many times    it develops a revenge fantasy. “Mr. In the face of this, we all sit around and tell apocryphal stories about shows where the network left you alone, where the show runner had a good heart and a light hand. Two people and a woman walk into a bar.”
One time, after a number of seriously offensive jokes were told in succession, I said, “Come on, you guys, am I going to have to leave the room?” Instead of apologizing, one of my male peers said to me, “If you think that’s rough, you haven’t been in enough writers’ rooms.”
“Don’t tell me where I’ve been, a–hole,” I replied. They seemed to think that I was some kind of factotum, or typewriter even. Mr. I directed All My Sons for a major regional theater, and I wrote and directed an independent movie. “They want you to write it,” he informed me. Basically that means making your bosses love you, whether or not you are doing a good job. The person they gave it to had virtually no credentials and no experience in the theater. The heart remains hopeful. Spielberg read one of your plays over the weekend, and he called this morning to say that he is infatuated.”
Let me tell you something. And the truth is, everyone in the industry knows it. One of the other executive producers kept saying, “But who is in charge?” He had never worked on a television show before so I assumed this was just informational, and I would tell him, point-blank: I am the show runner. Television is a training ground for fucking up people’s characters just enough to make them truly dangerous when they are finally given power over other creative souls. And that means all the time, and cheerfully—that, I’m not as good at. But in corporate culture, “play well with others” has come to mean absolutely agreeing to everything that gets thrown at you. I was explicitly told, during my firing, that the show was “too important to the network,” and so they were taking it out of my hands. I tell myself that it’s not just enraged ego; I have stories to tell. Okay, I didn’t really say that, I just thought it. I loved my postproduction supervisor and my line producer; both of them taught me life lessons about graceful professionalism, taking care of your collaborators. I was living where I wanted to be living, doing what I wanted to be doing, and hanging out with the people I wanted to be hanging out with. His television credits were nowhere near as comprehensive as mine. Men tell us this. I have other stories. I felt cheated by what had happened on Smash, and I was determined that the men who had cheated me would not have the last word on my talent and my character. Although, endlessly indulging in repetition compulsion might also be tagged as perseverance. And then my new agent and new manager and new lawyer all sat me down and explained to me, in no uncertain terms, that I had to take a step back, accept a demotion, and take a job below my skill set and pay grade. Then I couldn’t get hired for three years. No one likes being fired, and guess what, I am no exception. I was a good general.   •     •     •     •     •

I loved running a television show. Excerpted from   Double Bind: Women on Ambition edited by Robin Romm. No, it’s actually not like that. I also have to admit that it was fun rewriting my whole writ- ing staff on Smash. Mr. I’ve been on many different television shows over the years, and my husband is frankly enraged by the way people behave in this environment. This is another thing that “play well with others” means: Keep your mouth shut. He and the head of the network both believed that they were in charge. …
The misogyny is beyond anything that people believe when I tell these stories. He said musingly, “Two people walk into a bar. How to “manage up” was never very clear. As the dust settled, it became clear that at the management level a lot of dastardly stories had been invented about my character. I am also a talented and hardworking girl, and the truth is I do play well with others. •     •     •     •     •
My ambition is wearing me out. I also think that Lisa’s hungry little ego is a sort of pleasant and respectful version of the breed. There was a strange dysplasia. So maybe we’ve just been programmed this way. And the men who I’ve seen attain success in this world are salesmen, charmers; they know how to manage up. I tell stories about the shenanigans that go on in writers’ rooms, and my friends outside the business roar with laughter or cringe in disbelief. And I do want to do it again. He told me that he blamed himself. You think, Oh god, it’s so great having a kid, I don’t remember the pain. What storyteller does? But the rest of those stories are true. The show died under his watch. At the end of the first season, I was fired without cause. Spielberg, to give him much credit, called me the day I was fired and apologized. I cannot count the number of men—including my new agent and my new manager, who are great and on my side—who blithely announce that this is just the way things are. Who knows. I wanted to fight my way back into the game. Every show actually seems like just a great job at the beginning. The show was called Smash. The system is a killer. It sure felt like it. But in order to prove I could do it again, I had to be a good girl. So this is what I had to do, if I ever wanted to run a show again: I had to keep my head down and prove that I was smart and hardworking and a team player. The power structure includedtenmenandonewoman, and, inspiteof all theirsecond- guessing and wrangling, the show was terrific until they fired the woman in charge. Truth be told, I was in a healthier headspace back then. So yes, I am ambitious. I was an excellent general. Had I heard that Steven Spielberg had set up a project at Showtime, a TV series about backstage at a Broadway musical? I am a stubborn girl. Woody Allen has famously admitted the heart wants what it wants. Double Bind   hits shelves April 11. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner went out to Hollywood to make money, and the system treated them like this as well. No wait. But what does that mean? When she’s not writing for a television show, she doesn’t have decent health insurance. And, of course, as soon as I was fired, all the men who had conspired to have me removed from my post realized that the show wasn’t going to survive without me and so they slunk away and went off to do other things. Is this like childbirth? Well, they do pay you a lot of money. How did I get here again? The whole thing was dreadful. That’s another phrase I learned: manage up. He was kidding, but only sort of. Holy s—, I thought. And the earth will not survive without women claiming their voices and their partnership for its people. I liked that I had to write so much, I liked working with the actors and the directors, I liked production meetings, I liked going all over to location shoots, I loved editing. He was probably right. It is a given: You have to say yes to your boss all the time.   •     •     •     •     •

Freud writes eloquently about the ego’s need to return time and again to the same pattern of behavior, repetition compulsion, a drive so strong it overrides the pleasure principle and sends us back into traumatic situations that we know are traumatic. At least, I wasn’t chasing it. So women, who are suspect because there is this comfort level issue have to work extra hard to play well with others and manage up, in addition to sucking everything up and understanding that things are going to be handed to the guys, and then they’re going to tell a lot of sexist jokes and tell you to your face that you’re supposed to be writing the girl scenes because they’re too busy writing about shooting people and blowing things up and other utter bullshit. Why didn’t I stay there? On my first job in television, when I was in my twenties, I would sit, dazed, while a roomful of men sat around and told fist-up-the-ass jokes, roaring with laughter. I ran a clean set, so the people who worked there were happy. The thought of having your own TV show is a big promise to a hungry little ego. Women are told they have to be better, smarter, tougher, and more resilient than their male counterparts because, well, that’s just the way the world is. Everyone wants their own show. Was it gender based? I had to keep explaining to him how television shows work: You stand with the show runner. “What Came Next”   by Theresa Rebeck
Excerpted from   Double Bind: Women on Ambition,   edited by Robin Romm
So I’m walking to a rehearsal in Midtown, and my agent calls me. And that sort of thing is still going on: We all howl about it and write novels and plays and movies like Barton Fink, excoriate Hollywood, and then go back for more money. Sometimes I think of writ- ing that book and sometimes I think that writing that book and reliving the whole thing would be somewhat akin to shooting myself in the head. My heart wants to tell stories. But no matter how hard I tried—and trust me, I’m not a lunatic, and I did try—the boys didn’t want me running that show. Copyright © 2017 by Robin Romm. “I can’t say I enjoy writing for television,” another friend told me. I didn’t want to just slink away and disappear. My friend Lisa cops to the hungry little ego. I finished my third novel. The Buddhists call it samsara. But I don’t know one person on planet Earth who would have turned down that offer. She was about four years old. I am anxious to get on with them. Yeah, I think you have to be, to think that your work is worth the many millions of dollars to film it, and the attention of the audience.”
Her position, I think, really is swell. Telling stories for a living! You sit in a room with other writers eight hours a day, then the show runner comes in and makes all the decisions. I felt like what had hap- pened to me was yet another version of the recklessly hideous way so many talented women are treated—silenced, kicked to the curb. In television, we have to be very stubborn girls indeed. I wish this were not the story I have to tell today. It pissed me off that the men at my level who had been fired in similarly ridiculous circumstances somehow managed to bounce upward.

‘Unforgettable’ trailer: Rosario Dawson and Katherine Heigl wage a family feud

Rosario Dawson   has a dreamy new fiancé   and an adorable new stepdaughter   in the   upcoming thriller   Unforgettable, but unfortunately those blessings also come with an obsessive new nemesis. “Are you threatening me?” Tessa asks. As   Tessa begins waging psychological warfare against   Julia — questioning her parenting skills, sabotaging her relationship —   the women   seem destined for a showdown. EW has an exclusive look at the film’s latest trailer, which ratchets up the rivalry between Dawson’s Julia and Katherine Heigl’s Tessa, the scorned   ex-wife of Julia’s husband-to-be   (played by Geoff Stults). Things begin amicably enough, with Tessa welcoming Julia to the neighborhood with a gift basket, but her mask slips as she drives away. Watch the new trailer above for a taste of what happens next. Unforgettable opens April 21. Show Full Article “Yes,” Julia fires back.

‘The Help’: How to make Minny’s famous chocolate pie

The infamous poop-pie scene in 2011’s   The Help   involved some movie magic. In the scene, Minny (Octavia Spencer), a maid in civil-rights-era deep South, exacts her revenge for being unjustly fired from Hilly’s (Bryce Dallas Howard) home by   serving her former boss a poop-filled version of her famous chocolate pie.   “I had to have 12 pies for that scene in the movie, and it took me 12 hours to make them.”

For more revelations from the past four decades of entertainment, visit ew.com/untoldstories. In the place of milk, eggs, and sugar, Flemming used an almond-based milk substitute, egg beaters, and stevia for the modified dish. “We made our beautiful, beautiful pie with sugar and butter and all that sort of stuff and put it on the table. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes or until firm. The   different ingredients, however, altered how the pie looked. Furthermore, Flemming, who had been using pre-made pie crust for the pies, had to hand make a gluten-free crust, “which took forever to do,” she says. Top with a dollop of Cool Whip. Then, we switched it out for a pie that didn’t have any sugar in it for [Howard],” says the film’s property master Chris Ubick. Show Full Article So, the crew painted the gluten-free pie’s crust to match the pure chocolate one, which Ubick describe as “a little movie magic.”
Below you’ll find the recipe Flemming used for every pie in the movie — except for the one eaten by Howard:
1 unbaked 9-inch pie shell
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons of cocoa
1/4 cup butter, melted
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 small can evaporated milk (Pet)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Cool Whip
Combine all ingredients and blend well with mixer. To read more Untold Stories, pick up the new issue of   Entertainment Weekly, on stands now,   or buy it here   — and subscribe   for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. “It was a very big slight of hand scene so that she could eat lots of pie and not feel like she’s been eating so much sugar.”
All of the movie’s pies, including the sugarless one, were made Lee Ann Flemming, a local baker in Mississippi who modified her recipe to make a vegan and sugar-less pie for the scene. Pour into unbaked pie shell that has been pricked with a fork on the bottom and sides. While it’s pretty clear that the movie is using a real pie, what you might not know is that the scene actually featured   two pies.